HfS Network

Category Archives: Sourcing Change Management

The broader issues behind Brexit send a frightening message to the services industry

June 26, 2016 | Phil Fersht

The vote for Brexit wasn't really about debating the finer points of EU membership - it was a big thumbs down for the establishment from over half the UK voters who feel disenfranchised.  This is a reflection of the ever-widening gap between the wealthy and the working classes, the educated and the uneducated, the socially-connected ambitious younger generation and the disconnected older generations, who've lost interest in the direction of the modern world that no longer represents their interests.

Moreover, this rebellion against the establishment can be clearly mirrored in many of our enterprises, where similar issues of disenfranchisement are rapidly permeating.

Rote jobs are being eliminated with limited reorientation and progression planning

We talk a lot about the new work and career opportunities being created by digital disruption and digital business models, but these require greater problem solving skills, critical thinking and creative capability, if the World Economic Forum's new jobs report is to be believed:

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And while we can complacently talk about all the exciting work creation the As-a-Service Economy is bringing, we've already precisely pinpointed that 30% of routine, low-value positions

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Posted in: Business Process Outsourcing (BPO)Digital TransformationHfSResearch.com Homepage

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Can HPE + CSC dominate the digital underbelly, or has that ship sailed?

June 19, 2016 | Phil Fersht
Digital Underbelly

Just stare at that digital underbelly... there's a lot of work needed down there!

When the news broke last month about the second largest IT services merger of all time (after the 2008 HP-EDS whopper), the reaction among the services cognoscenti was - and has continued to be - one of confusion.  Big services mergers have just not done very well over the years. HP/EDS was a culture clash of immense proportions - and occurred right before the great recession, while other mergers, like Dell's acquisition of Perot, has resulted in the old Perot business being flipped over to NTT Data at a significant loss, and the Xerox/ACS merger has been shaken up and spun off and needs a major reinvention under new CEO Ashok Vemuri to get the company back on track.  Meanwhile, Capgemini and IGATE are still figuring out the best pieces of each other to mesh together, while not taking their eye off the ball, during the services industries' most cut-throat transition phase.

We heard HPE CEO, Meg Whitman, excitedly address the firm’s key clients and industry analysts at HP’s recent Discover event in Las Vegas, with an obsessive focus on “digital transformation” and the impending impact of “digital disruption”.  However, the real opportunity for HPE isn’t really in the design of digital business models for clients, it’s the enablement of them – it’s the provision of the agile “digital underbelly” to make digital change really happen for enterprises.

It's easy to be cynical about legacy IT services, but there's an awful lot of it to scrap over as enterprises are forced to fix their plumbing

Digesting the merger of these two struggling services giants has resulted in more rumination than most, considering the timing, sheer scale, transitional uncertain market and motivation. This is not a time when most traditional service providers are looking to add more global delivery scale to already large foundations – most are trying to slim down their delivery armies and sales forces,

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Posted in: Analytics and Big DataBusiness Process Outsourcing (BPO)Buyers' Sourcing Best Practices

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When did employees become "costs"?

May 21, 2016 | Phil Fersht

Stapler - Office MovieIt suddenly dawned on me what the core issue is with the future of the workplace: the simple fact that company leaders and their stakeholders started viewing employees as walking costs at some stage over the last 30 years, and have devoted a huge amount of focus and energy trying to figure out how to remove as many of them from their business as possible... without it impacting the top line.

Surely, people, human labor should be viewed as a valuable commodity that adds value to a business, not some burden on the profit margin that needs to be eliminated at all costs?  So what's really gone amiss here?

Enterprises hired people into jobs they no longer value. Over the decades, our enterprises have ballooned with staff hired to provide inputs into process chains to keep them ticking over - whether they were writing lines of spaghetti code to make processes flow from one subtask to the next, or producing reports out of SAP for a historical view of the business some manager will archive away

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Posted in: HfSResearch.com HomepageHR StrategySourcing Change Management

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The back office is dead... long live OneOffice

May 13, 2016 | Phil Fersht

Intelligent OneOfficeIf someone called you "back office", I'd imagine you'd be a little bit offended.  It's probably not much worse than being called "useless", or "about to be automated out of existence"...

But I have good news for you back-office rebels - your time spent festering in the backend of yonder is finally coming to an end. Why?  Because the onset of digital and emerging automation solutions, coupled with the dire need to access meaningful data in real-time, is forcing the back and middle to support the customer experience needs of the front.

Our soon-to-be released study on achieving Intelligent Operations, which canvassed 371 major buyside enterprises, reveals two key dynamics that are unifying the front, middle and back offices:

  1. A "customer first mindset" is the leading business driver driving operations strategies.  Over half of upper management (51%) view their customers' experiences as impacting sourcing model change and strategy, which is placing the relevance and value of the back office in the spotlight.
  2. Three quarters of enterprises (75%) claim digital is having a radical impact. We can debate the meaning and relevance of digital forever, but the bottom line is that enterprise leaders need to (be seen) to have a digital strategy - and a support function which can facilitate these digital interactions and data needs. The old barriers where staff in the back office don't need to think and merely oversee operational process delivery, and those in the middle, which only venture a part of the way to aligning processes to customer needs, are fading away.

Consequently, we're evolving to an era where there is only "OneOffice" that matters anymore,

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Posted in: 2016 Intelligent Ops StudyAnalytics and Big DataBusiness Process Outsourcing (BPO)

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Buyers perceive Accenture, Deloitte and KPMG as the most trusted consultants for achieving Intelligent Operations

May 06, 2016 | Phil Fersht

john-lylyIn 1588, the English dramatist John Lyly, in his Euphues and his England, wrote:

"...As neere is Fancie to Beautie, as the pricke to the Rose, as the stalke to the rynde, as the earth to the roote."

In other words, "Beauty is in the eye of the Beholder", which just about sums up how buyers perceive consultants when they need some serious rethinking and rewiring done to their operations to make them more intelligent:

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So what's actually surprising here?

In the past, you may have expected to see the pureplay strategy houses rule the roost, however, when we break down the Change Management and Solution Ideals enterprises need to achieve more Intelligent Operations, the focus shifts much more to using consultants with real change management, process transformation, analytics and automation chops... this is less about strategy, and more about just driving through the changes. Most company leaders know where they want to go - it's now more about executing a plan to get there:

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The Bottom-line: We're moving to a world where the expertise enterprises need to be successful is really changing 

One of the above firms asked me recently if it should start an automation practice.  My response was "If you're only asking me this now, then you're already too late to the game".  In a nutshell, enterprise operations functions need genuine expertise in adopting a mindset to write off their legacy systems and obsolete processes - and a real understanding of how to approach automation and embrace digital opportunities.

A lot of this is about prioritizing what not to automate and learning where digital transformation actually makes business sense. This is about creating an operations function that can pivot and support the rapid changing needs of the front office with actionable data, that is secure and available in real-time.  This is about defining and devising a digital strategy that has the customer at the forefront of the business and an operational support function that has the customer experience at its core.

Hence, consultants need talent that can not only think creatively with their clients, but also create an ongoing environment for writing off legacy, embracing change and being smart and proactive about leveraging automation and real digital strategies effectively. The speed at which some of these advisors must make the pivot from merely brokering transactional contracts, or spouting off some high level fluffy strategy, to supporting real change is critical - I'd imagine we'll know in the next 9-12 months which ones will genuinely be helping their clients achieve these ambitious ideals.

Posted in: 2016 Intelligent Ops StudyBusiness Process Outsourcing (BPO)Design Thinking

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Rescuing BPO from its trough of directionless boredom: Make jobs challenging and creative

April 17, 2016 | Phil Fersht

Bored BPO CatWhen your enterprise is increasingly dependent on hiring "Millennials" with digital skills and lower wage needs, you'd better figure out a plan for creating exciting, challenging career paths, or you're pretty much already doomed.

Sadly, our Talent in BPO study from last year tells a very depressing tale when you ask BPO delivery executives what they think of their BPO career:

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What's alarming is the failure of enterprises to create and communicate a viable BPO career path for seven-out-of-eight professionals with under two years' experience.  And - while 63% of newbies strongly agree their job is vital to business performance, a depressing one-in-eight are actually excited by their career choice.  When people get past the first couple of years, their experience clearly improves, but the concern here is how can we attract top (or even middling) talent into BPO careers, when there is such a negative perception of the potential of the job.  If we can't attract the talent, the industry will never progress beyond a cost/efficiency play.

What can we do to attract the "Digital Generation" into the BPO business?

Start new hires on activities that require creativity and critical thinking. Working in BPO has to be about delivering capabilities beyond rote, operational processes.  Today's college graduates are simply not coming out of school willing to perform mundane routine work.  Just look at the new WEF jobs report to see how skills requirements are quickly shifting, as business needs evolve - especially the need for creative skills, going from number ten to number three in merely five years:

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In the past, for example, an accountant would often earn his/her chops processing accounts and doing routine GL work, before progressing to controllership activities, such as budgeting, quality audits, FP&A, forecasting and risk assessment work.  With much better technology and offshoring

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Posted in: 2015 Talent in BPO StudyAnalytics and Big DataBusiness Process Outsourcing (BPO)

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Let's get lean digital with Shantanu

April 15, 2016 | Phil Fersht
Shantanu Ghosh, SVP CFO Services and Consulting, Genpact

Shantanu Ghosh, SVP CFO Services and Consulting, Genpact (Click for bio)

Digital, digital everywhere, but what about the finance function? It took a decade for accountants to make the seismic shift from Lotus 1-2-3 to MS Excel... so how much focus is our favorite business function putting on today's advances in analytics tools, interactive and collaborative solutions, mobility and automation?

Can finance executives really embrace digital to break away from some of the legacy mindsets, processes and technologies that have plagued the function for decades?

Not too many people have been driving the digital agenda as aggressively with the CFO's office than Genpact's Shantanu Ghosh, with his firm's own methodology "lean digital," so we thought it high-time we caught up with him to get his viewpoint on the impact of digital o the finance function.

Phil Fersht, CEO and Industry Analyst, HfS: Shantanu, it's been a couple of years since we've had you on here. Can you tell us a bit about what you're up to in Genpact today?

Shantanu Ghosh, Senior VP & Business Leader - CFO Services and Consulting, Genpact:  Actually, my remit remains pretty similar to what it was two years back. I lead the financial accounting, sourcing and procurement service lines, globally. I also lead consulting across Genpact.

But I'll tell you, the complexities, the scale and the type of solutions involved in all three have changed pretty dramatically in the last two to three years. So it feels like I’m doing a new job every day, even though broadly the remit remains the same.

Phil: I've seen Genpact has been on a real tear, particularly over the last 12 to 18 months. I’ve seen a real uptick, especially in Europe, where you're winning a lot of deals. What's going on? What are you doing differently?

Shantanu: I think there are four things at play, Phil. One, I think it's a result of there or four years of sustained investment in our domain capability and our front-end capability. Obviously, in this business it takes a little bit of time for that to result in winnings in the marketplace, because you have to start engaging with clients at a different level. Then you get into a virtuous cycle, because

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Posted in: Business Process Outsourcing (BPO)Digital TransformationFinance & Accounting BPO

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Twelve ways to survive the race to irrelevance - download your life jacket now!

April 12, 2016 | Phil Fersht

If you weren't able to make our excellent buyers summit at our research partner Cambridge University, we managed to crack the code (finally) on surviving in these disruptive times - in twelve simple steps.  Just download our report and all will become crystal clear:

cambridge-report-promo

Posted in: Business Process Outsourcing (BPO)Digital TransformationHfSResearch.com Homepage

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How digital is transforming finance - Exclusive insights from our latest study

April 08, 2016 | Phil Fersht

75% of finance executives agree that the new wave of digital technologies is fundamentally changing the way that the finance function operates. So what will the finance function of the future really look like?

Join us on April 21st to be part of this exclusive webinar and find out!

Digital Finance Webinar Blog

Join these experts from HfS Research, Genpact, Mondelez and KPMG as they discuss the findings from recent research that shows how digital technologies are delivering competitive advantage. They will share their insight on the future of F&A and explore:

  • What are the key drivers for F&A leaders to embed digital technologies, such as SaaS platforms, analytics, mobility tools, RPA, and machine learning, into their operations?
  • Where are most F&A organizations in their digital journeys and what lessons have they learnt?
  • What are the talent requirements and skill sets that finance leaders need in their functions to take advantage of digital technologies?
  • Where are digital pioneers investing and what challenges are they experiencing?

REGISTER NOW!

Posted in: Analytics and Big DataCognitive ComputingDesign Thinking

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It's time we started Being As-a-Service

March 23, 2016 | Phil Fersht

Coming away from our Cambridge University buyers summit this week, I was pleasantly surprised by the increased level of sophistication and maturity many services buyers are now exhibiting.

Gone are the provider bitch-fests and endless ranting about failed promises and absent innovation (that they didn't pay for in the first place).  Instead, there was a desire to look at themselves, and really try to figure out how to broker change and run their outsourcing engagements as part of a broader business agenda, not some quirky siloed activity, forever tarnished by the word "outsourcing".

Adopting a mindset to change today (not tomorrow), is where everything must start

Yes, the conversation has turned to buyers accepting they need to change first, before heaping all the blame for their woes onto their service providers. This is why our Ideals of As-a-Service begin with a mandate for buyers and providers to change how they behave, how they can adopt a mindset to start writing off their legacy processes and technologies.  In short, it's time we focused on fixing our present - it's time we focused on Being As-a-Service:

Being-as-a-Service

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It's time we stopped talking about this scenario of "this was legacy and this is our future desired endstate"... we'll just remain stuck in this perpetual stranglehold of never getting anywhere. We'll always we a work-in-progress, a project that never finishes...

As someone joked during our Cambridge University summit this week "Cognitive computing is always going to be huge in the future"... so let's stop evangelizing about a nirvana we many never reach and, instead, start talking about what we need to do today. Let's stop panicking about the future, which is scaring so many people, and start focusing on what we can do today to be more effective.

Let's start talking about Being As-a-Service today... not tomorrow, or some far off point in the future, where we just hope this all becomes somebody else's nightmare...

Bottom-line: We have to narrow the chasm between hype and reality in order to be successful in the present

Our industry is beset by fear, like never before. People are scared - they know their skills and capabilities could quickly become obsolete in a world where the job openings increasingly demand creativity, analytical prowess and an ability to pivot across domains.  Suddenly, if you're not a Digital native who talks about endless disruption and the coming robo-geddon, you're a dinosaur... The gap between hype and reality has reached ridiculous proportions, and it's time we stopped thinking about the fantastical future and focus on what we can achieve today.

Successful sourcing executives have to become "brokers of capability" (which one buyer commented sounds like a rock band) where they can live in the present to drive a change mindset for the future. Most of the executives have been tasked with adopting Digital strategies (whatever those may be) and to come up with smart approaches to take advantage of automation technologies. But to get there, they need to change how their teams think, collaborate and operate.

It's a mindset change, it's a culture change. It's about bringing together the key stakeholders and delivery leads to address the As-a-Service Ideals today and stop looking at them as some far off nirvana someone else will take them to.  Simply put, most firms can't simply saw-off their legacy by disposing of some archaic ERP system and slamming in some SaaS product, or mimicking every defunct manual process into a piece of RPA software, or firing an entire department of ineffective process wonks. In fact, a lot of the legacy actually works and the ROI of binning it doesn't make financial sense.  Writing-off legacy is about starting the process of re-imagining a future without those legacy systems and processes that are holding back our businesses.

So the Ideals of As-a-Service can be initially addressed today by making the most of what we currently have, not simply waiting for the day budget magically appears from above to bring in teams of nose-ringed consultants to redesign our businesses.

Posted in: 2015 As-a-Service StudyAnalytics and Big DataBusiness Process Outsourcing (BPO)

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