Monthly Archives: Sep 2018

Seven deadly misnomers why these billion dollar RPA valuations are insane

September 21, 2018 | Phil FershtElena Christopher

It's not been possible to escape the wild world of RPA valuations these past few months, culminating in the recent claim from UiPath and its investors that the firm is worth $3 billion, despite the reality that AA's annual revenues this past year are ~$100m, Blue Prism's ~$55m and UiPath's ~$65m (HFS estimates). 

As much as I would love to celebrate my friends Daniel Dines', Mihir Shukla's and Alastair Bathgate's untold wealth, I have done my homework with my  analyst colleague Elena Christopher and, while these three gentlemen and their teams will undoubtedly become exceedingly wealthy from locking up the RPA market, valuations as high as $3 billion are, sadly, pure science fiction.  I welcome any of these three dudes to save a copy of this post and proclaim to me "I told you so" in a couple of years - and I will gladly accept a glass of their champagne - but we hate to burst this bubble with seven misnomers why RPA is not your typical Silicon Valley software fantasy:

1. RPA directly replaces people.  This is incorrect, its all about augmenting processes and the improving the quality of the workforce, not eliminating actual employees with bots.  As our recent State of Operations Study with KPMG, across 381 Global 2000 operations leaders, illustrates, only 7% go into automation expecting direct FTE reduction.  Consequently, the C-Suites from 70% of these organizations are happy with the ability of RPA to reduce reliance on labor.  Hence RPA augments labor, it doesn't replace it.

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2. RPA can scale rapidly to have a dramatic impact on enterprises in months. Incorrect. The vast majority of these initiatives are project-based, not scaled - only 13% of RPA adopters are currently scaled up and industrialized, according to new data from 590 enterprises worldwide.  Most RPA adopters are still tinkering with projects and not rushing towards enterprise scale adoption.

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3. RPA tools can achieve amazing benefits all by their lonesome. Incorrect. RPA has to be driven by a motivated business line, and supported by capable IT.  This isn’t the typical software sales model where licenses are sold en masse and distributed willy-nilly across the business.  Without a genuine buy-in and partnership between business units and IT, RPA fails.  There has to be a balance.

4. RPA delivers intelligence.  Incorrect.  RPA is a gateway drug to digitize low-value processes and free up human-time to focus on higher value activities.  RPA is a catalyst to drive a more intelligent enterprise operations but is not intelligent itself.

5. RPA will be a unique game-changing product in the market for years to come.  Incorrect.  Most organizations take a couple of years to learn and understand how to incorporate the benefits of RPA, but after that it's merely a tool in the enterprise toolbox.

6. We will still be talking about “Robotic Process Automation” in two years time.  Very unlikely.  The narrative is already shifting to a broader Intelligent Automation roadmap.  RPA is very good at breathing new life into legacy processes and technologies but isn’t driving genuine digital business model transformation. RPA helps digitize the underbelly that supports the ultimate digital business outcomes by digitizing manual processes and fixes system integration points.  It is a gateway to achieving front to back office workflows that are critical for digital business to service the needs of their customers in real-time. However. once RPA has performed these tasks, the real challenge for enterprises in going beyond simple RPA to drive real intelligence into the processes. Hence, RPA is a gateway to creating basic digital infrastructure across the organization, but other AI tools are needed in the future to help organizations anticipate their customer actions before they happen. 

The more intelligent your business operations, the more you can stay ahead of the game, but none of this is possible if your processes are not automated effectively to create this knowledge for your business operators:

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Once the digital baseline is created, enterprises need to create more intelligent bots to perform more sophisticated tasks than repetitive data and process loops. This means having unattended and attended interactions with data sources both inside and outside of the enterprise.  

7. Valuations of $2/3 billion per firm are realistic.  Incorrect.  While software vendors such as Mulesoft and Marketo have recently fetched insane multiples of $5bn-$6bn, these are very established IT applications that augment multi-billion dollar industries.  RPA tools are supporting backend automations that require a very unique combination of business/IT aligned delivery, as opposed to being front-end apps that can be sold to IT budgets en masse.  RPA is a BandAid, not your new enterprise platform.  These are not the typical products an SAP or Oracle can easy ingest into their apps portfolios - the needs are too process heavy, too consultant dependent to fit their sales models.  

The Bottom-Line:  Let's love RPA for what is it, not what some people, who do not understand it, pretend it to be

RPA has dramatically altered the narrative among middle/back office process owners.  We predict a market approaching $2 billion this year alone and growing fast as traditional process outsourcing models are hugely impacted.  We've even gone as far as declaring RPA the "new outsourcing".  RPA has been a major game changer in the world of operations and outsourcing.... but $3 billion valuations of software firms barely hitting $50m in revenues?  We don't think so... let's learn to keep nurturing this great business and not squeeze it until it breaks.

While the industry is busily adding fancy new words to their résumés and job titles, we have to remember that our technological journey is gradual.  Change comes slowly and incrementally and you can't just rip off the proverbial Band-Aid, hire a bunch of Millennials and Gen-Z kids... and it's mission accomplished. As the Hyper-Connected journey illustrates, it took 30 years to get where we are today - and that's because both front and back offices needed to go through major, secular changes to become efficient and digitized.

But the next phase is not a trade-secret - this "Future of Work" is merely a phased transformation of the present.  Dumb robots evolving into intelligent assistants... ineffective supply chains plagued with manual breakpoints becoming fluid, autonomous and intelligent - with the ability to interact with other supply chains.  Quantum computing and blockchain emerging to challenge the very logic of TCP/IP and computing architectures. But to get there, we need to be experimenting, tinkering, exploring and disrupting with the kit that available today to get our organizations in a place where all these far-flung innovations can have some real possibilities.  

So let's have less talk about the future of work and focus on the present... we know where we are and what we need to do.  So let's do it!

Posted in: Robotic Process AutomationIntelligent Automation

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IBM, Accenture, Cognizant, Atos and HCL leading the Top 10 infrastructure and

September 20, 2018 | Phil FershtJamie SnowdonOllie O’Donoghue

it's easy to overlook our digital underbelly during these times of AI hype and "let's make a few billion based purely on investor hype" fantasies.  But who's providing the tools and grunt to make all this possible?  HFS analyst Ollie O'Donoghue has pooled our study data from the Global 2000, conducted countless enterprise interviews and driven the providers potty to deliver the perfect poignant viewpoint of this industry:

Click for a detailed view of the leading 18 providers

Ollie, what are the major trends in the infrastructure market?

Over the last few years, the infrastructure market has taken a bit of a battering with the kings of hyperscale eroding market share, and enterprises looking for more exciting things to spend their money on than traditional “lift and shift” engagements. However, that’s all changing, and the market is evolving. The big providers are partnering up with the hyperscale cloud players and making them a valuable tool in their toolbox. Moreover, “digital” has fueled enterprises’ appetite for technology. Which means getting their infrastructure and digital foundations in order. After all, these overhyped technologies like AI and blockchain have to run off something!

The challenge for us as analysts covering the space is rethinking how we assess and evaluate providers. In essence, partnerships have become a much more critical part of this market – if a firm isn’t befriending the big cloud leviathans, then they’re likely to struggle to build offerings that resonate with evolving enterprise appetite. The challenge is that as all providers follow this path, there’s a degree of equilibrium, so the assessment needs to evolve further and evaluate how these providers are leveraging partnerships, and building value-add offerings. We also need to scrutinize how providers are developing automation capabilities to design and build more resilient, scalable and cost-effective infrastructure solutions for clients. So while this is a mature market, it’s one that’s changing all the time – and one that certainly keeps us, analysts, busy.

So who’s winning this infrastructure and cloud war?

IBM’s still the undisputed champion of the infrastructure and cloud market – Big Blue brings with it unrivalled enterprise trust, and is the only IT Services major that truly has the cloud capability and resources to fight alongside the hyperscale leviathans AWS, Google, and Microsoft. It also has true scale and ability to manage the largest most complex engagements in this space. That being said, Accenture has an uncompromised reputation for delivering quality and bringing best in class capabilities to engagements. From an enterprise perspective, the fact that this comes at a premium count against the firm to some extent. And while Accenture executives assure us they’re building commercial models to make pricing more attractive, the reputation for being expensive is relatively well set in, and any changes might be like trying to get toothpaste back into the tube. Although let’s be honest, there are worse problems to have than being known for delivering quality at a price.

And the main movers and shakers in the Top 5?

A couple of firms are worth mentioning – Atos performed well because of a concerted effort from the firm to broaden and deepen partnerships with major cloud players. It’s now shaken hands with all of the big hyperscale players and is doing some exciting work around analytics with Google. Atos has also pulled some fresh thinking out of the bag and built a compelling vision for hybrid cloud. HCL has excelled at large scale transformation, is also doing interesting work in the space and comes with strong client references – the consensus is, HCL will keep working to get the job done, bringing in automation capabilities to get the most out of assets. And then we have Cognizant, another firm that is striving to deliver innovation through all its infrastructure services is producing offerings that focus on specific client’s needs. Ensuring business value is delivered, whilst pushing hard down the hybrid cloud path – in recognition that the future of cloud will be leveraging multiple providers to deliver the best results.

So what about the Top 10 overall, any surprises there, Ollie?

The big heavy lifters hold a competitive position, TCS brings a lot to the party and has an enviable track-record of delivery in some industries and loyal clients that leverage the firms considerable global delivery network. Similarly, Infosys is positioned competitively, reflecting the investment the firm is making in building out nearshore delivery centers and redeveloping talent into higher value areas of work. However, the firm does struggle to get its message out there which is holding it back a tad. And then we have DXC – the leviathan firm can bring considerable brains and brawn to engagements, but its path is still unclear to some clients and all eyes are on its financial reports looking for stability at a time when providers sinking can drag clients down with it. Unisys relies on its strong legacy in the Infrastructure space – and innate trust from some industries, particularly financial services. Supplemented by respectable security credentials and offerings. Finally, Wipro is driving a competitive approach to writing off legacy through a cloud-only approach, a strategy which could see the firm drive further up the top 10 list in the future.

So what does the future look like for the market?

We’ve been charting the major trends impacting the infrastructure space for some time now and it’s a quickly moving market. Partnerships are no longer a nice-to-have, they are mandatory if providers are going to have a chance of survival. Finally, the big providers are warming to the potential value they can leverage from the cloud giants, rather than shaking hands through gritted teeth as their revenues eroded. This is an important step as the market matures. But the biggest shift is the rosier tint the market now has after years of revenue freefall. Shifts to cloud and as-a-service hammered traditional revenues – which often made up a sizeable chunk of vendor revenues. But with some compute-heavy applications and technologies on the cards, spending on infrastructure is very much back in vogue. The smart enterprises are investing in their digital underbelly now, in preparation for their future digital needs.  

Bottom line: Our partners who got us here may not be the ones to take us where we're going - the future’s all about smart partnering as the need for savvy IT talent reaches critical levels

If we take a look at revenue projections for the market, it’s not the good news providers are looking for. With As-a-Service and cloud continuing to batter traditional revenues, the market is unlikely to grow from a revenue perspective. But it’s not going to shrink either - we see this market is bouncing back in other ways as enterprises urgently seek help digitizing their operations and scaling their digital businesses: technology is at the heard of C-Suite strategy these days, and partnerships which provide scarce talent to keep these increasingly data-driven environments agile, scalable and secure are critical for enterprises.

Reputationally, IT infrastructure has always had a hard time – security breaches, server crashes, and integration challenges. But all of that’s changing now as automation drives service quality up, and costs down. And partnerships are supporting providers in offering clients best-in-class cloud capabilities at a time when the contents of their digital shopping list needs to be running on the best. 

There is a massive opportunity to lead in the world of IT services, provided you can plug these skills gaps. The challenge is breaking out of the traditional sourcing model to access niche talent across the globe in areas such as crypto-technology, Python development, Lisp, Prolog, Go and C++. While most traditional firms still rely heavily on bread and butter IT services delivered at scale from regions such as India, the emergence of talent in Central and Eastern Europe, China and parts of South America also need to be brought into play. The IT services world will be a very different place in a couple of years as boutique firms offering niche skills come into the fore. Not to mention the emergence of crowdsourcing for IT talent. Having really savvy IT leaders who can cobble together crack teams on-tap to solve their IT headaches is already becoming a huge differentiator for many firms. The will also be a role for the super services integrator, who can pull together teams for clients to work with them on complex projects.

To this end, we recently presented the Digital OneOffice Concept to 100 C-Suite executives to understand what is holding back both business and IT leaders from reaching the promised land of perfect real-time symmetry of their business operations staying ahead of their customers’ needs.  While the business leaders grapple with changing their mindsets, the IT leaders were quick to call out their skills deficiencies to enable their businesses to achieve a digital OneOffice.  

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Hence, those providers which can pull together the resources and talent can still profit from this disruptive market - the digital engine can only purr when it's aligned with all the core components of the business, right from the front to back office.  Today's market is all about taking bigger bets on bigger risks... and only the smartest and boldest will make it.

Premium HFS subscribers can click here to download: The HFS TOP TEN Report:  Infrastructure and enterprise cloud services 2018

Posted in: Cloud ComputingDigital TransformationDigital OneOffice

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1. #AutomationAnywhere, 2. #BluePrism, and 3. #UiPath make up the top three in the inaugural HfS Top 10

September 17, 2018 | Phil FershtSaurabh Gupta

The rise of RPA is nothing short of spectacular as the market closes in on $2bn this year. It has captivated the attention of the digital operations executives with the promise of cost-savings beyond labor arbitrage, cost avoidance by extending the life of legacy IT, quicker implementation than traditional IT projects, business-user friendliness, auditability and compliance, straight through processing, and let’s be honest – terrific marketing!

And here is the actual report:  Completely free to celebrate our first "HFS TOP TEN REPORT"

However, confusion around RPA deployments is also rife. There are growing questions whether RPA can deliver on the promised ROI and outcomes. Most RPA initiatives continue to be small and piecemeal. Truly scaled RPA deployments are rare. The industry is still struggling to solve challenges around the process, change, talent, training, infrastructure, security, and governance.

With the mission to demystify this confusion and uncover the truth to successful RPA deployment, we conducted a first of its kind RPA CX research to develop the list of “HFS Top 10 RPA Products” (See Exhibit 1). The research is based on interviews over 350 clients and product partners across the ten leading RPA products across:

  • Ability to execute based on product functionality (Ease of integration with legacy IT, Unassisted automation functionality, OCR functionality, Scheduling functionality, Development tools, Exception handling, Required set-up coding, Ease of product configuration); integration and support (Service extensions and connectors, Documentation, Certification program, Training and customer support, Experience in serving multiple geographies, Adoption across multiple industries, Required IT skill-sets), and security and governance (Uptime and SLA commitments, Version control and upgrade management, Centralized controls, Regulatory compliance, Enterprise security, Disaster Recovery (DR) and Business Continuity Planning (BCP))
  • Innovation capability based on flexibility and scalability (Accommodating process / environment changes, Licensing model flexibility, Ability to handle multiple processes, Workflow templates and library of processes, Handling multiple inputs) and embedding intelligence (Processing structured, semi-structured, and unstructured data, Operational Analytics, Dashboards, and Artificial Intelligence (AI) capabilities)
  • Voice of the customer based on the RPA products ability to drive business outcomes (Realizing cost savings, Speed-to-market, Overall satisfaction, and Client reference ability)

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Key highlights from the HFS Top 10 RPA Provider assessment

  • Overall RPA Client Experience has been 'Good.' The aggregated average CX scores across all assessment dimensions is three on a scale of 4 implying a good overall experience. For most clients, RPA has created value in addition to reducing costs (just not as much and as fast as they heard in the first sales pitch!). For almost all the RPA products assessed, security, controls, accuracy, integration, and out-of-the-box functionality performs as promised. Basically, RPA works!
  • Getting RPA “production ready” is not as easy as promised. The client experience with the amount of coding/configuration required is rated amongst the lowest. Management of version control and upgrades as well the training and support offered by RPA providers was also sub-par. The primary reason behind this is a classic expectation mismatch – the RPA providers oversold and overpromised, raising the client expectations beyond normal, that then resulted in less than required client investments towards process and change management. The disappointment associated with RPA is not about the technology itself.
  • RPA is not very smart (at least as of today). The dimension around embedding intelligence in RPA was rated amongst the lowest by clients. There is considerable confidence in RPA’s ability to process structured data but drops down significantly when asked about unstructured or even semi-structured data. Clients are not convinced about the Artificial Intelligence (AI) capabilities of their RPA products. The good news is that most RPA providers recognize this and are investing in building out capabilities especially around Machine Learning (ML). At HfS, we believe that the holy grail of service delivery will be at the intersection of the Triple-A Trifecta – Automation, AI, and Analytics

Bottomline. RPA works but is not a magic wand. Best practices are emerging

Based on our in-depth conversations with the RPA clients, we developed a set of best practices that you need to keep in mind when implementing any of the RPA products:

  • RPA is not a silver bullet. Keep expectations realistic
  • RPA cannot automate everything. Choose the use-case wisely
  • RPA success is not about technology. Treat it as a change agent
  • Automated processes are still processes. Invest in documentation, especially as for complex automations
  • RPA vendors are product companies. Do not expect them to behave like service providers
  • Do not side-step your IT folks. RPA success requires IT-business collaboration
  • RPA products are still nascent. Do not short-change security and testing
  • RPA is not a one-time exercise. Change management and ongoing governance and the keys to continued success
  • RPA is not the holy grail. Business outcomes driven by integrated solutions are
  • RPA does not solve your data issues. Data-centric mindset is the key
  • RPA offers more than cost savings. Think beyond cost-reduction and figure out how to measure success

And here is the actual report:  Completely free to celebrate our first "HFS TOP TEN REPORT"

Posted in: Robotic Process AutomationIntelligent Automation

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Barely a third of outsourcing deals are now safe: Window-dressing legacy engagements is over

September 13, 2018 | Phil Fersht

We’ve been talking about the legacy model of butts-on-seats “mess for less” outsourcing fizzling out for years, but somehow the same old candidates have clung on grimly to the same old model, relying on clients that still find a modicum of comfort negotiating rate cards down to the lowest common denominator, content to hobble along with average service delivery that just about keeps everyone paid… and somehow relevant.

As we’ve bemoaned the decreasing growth rates across almost all traditional areas of business and IT services, no one’s pressed the panic button to do anything wildly different.  In fact, many have used the recent stagnant times to merge with each other to eke out a bit more revenue growth and rationalize costs wherever possible.

Meanwhile, all the providers have slapped the lovely “digital” tag on pretty much ever new client dollar that wasn’t obviously a help desk deal or some server consolidation.  Yes, people, even good old app testing today has managed to be magically reformulated as a “digital” service by some.

The balance of power sits firmly with the enterprise clients, and many have no choice but to jump ship from the old model

Being realistic, the IT and business services business is no different than it was five years ago, except there is a lot more cloud… and a lot more window dressing.  But that is all changing, and our new research reveals a new services economy is upon us.

But, finally, many enterprise clients are wising up to the reality they now wield a lot more power over service providers as the market flattens to a state of hyper-commoditization and negligible-to-pathetic growth.  Many are, finally, awakening to a new dawn that service providers can (and most are) able to takeout delivery cost through better deployment of cloud, less costly SaaS apps, and applying robotic process automation to reduce manual workarounds and augment people delivery. 

Simply put, if your long-time service provider is failing to deliver you any of these benefits to your business, or at least is making some strides to incorporate pricing that is tied to successful service execution and not only people effort, then it’s time to cut bait before you get fired yourself for perpetuating a legacy model that is depriving your firm from finding new thresholds of value your smarter competitors are already enjoying.

As this year’s State of Operations and Outsourcing study of 381 enterprise operations leaders across the Global 2000 reveals, only 30% of these relationships will continue to operate in the old model, while a similar number will stick with their service provider if they can have a shift towards business outcome pricing and a degree of automation applied.  27% have already given up on shifting the model with their current provider and have declared their attention to switch, while 17% want to end the misery and focus on bringing the work back inhouse, and look to simply automate it:

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The Bottom-line: Outsourcing is finally entering the uncomfortable phase of change that’s threatened for several years, and it’s going to get ugly.   

Judgement day is now upon the industry once known as outsourcing and this one will get pretty ugly before it eventually finds a new groove, where enterprises and service providers find real value in each other again. 

History has told us time and time again that nothing in this business changes until deals are lost and the C-Suite is forced to address why this is really happening… and actually act on it.  This is the fine balance in which we find ourselves today, where actions will change dramatically when 2% growth spirals into a 5-10% decline because that is what will happen to many service providers if they truly cannot pivot to deliver value beyond cheap labor. 

Those providers which have the capability to make the necessary investments and adjustments will take a few hits, but rebuild for a new phase… those which think they can keep papering over the cracks, repeating to same old spin, but never fundamentally changing how they invest in solutions, talent and their clients, will quickly start moving backward (and fast) in the new services market that’s emerging.

Posted in: IT Outsourcing / IT Services

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It's Bots-in-Seats as IBM, Cognizant, Accenture, TCS, Infosys and Tech Mahindra lead the HFS TOP 10 Cognitive Assistants

September 07, 2018 | Phil FershtMelissa O'Brien

The word "Chatbot" is officially banned:  they treat conversations like they're a game of tennis: talk, reply, talk, reply.  There is little to no context and zero intelligence, just pre-programmed responses only set up to deal with a pre-set finite number of frequently asked questions.  It's a  legacy customer experience that most of us go out of our way to avoid.  To be blunt, it's easier to be redirected to an FAQ page, or even some online Q&A forum than try and engage in a dumb one-dimensional conversation.  I've had more intelligent conversations down my local pub after a 3.00am "lock-in"... So let's shift the entire conversation towards chatbots with some form of intelligence...cognitive assistants.

HFS Research sees cognitive assistants as the combination of conversational interaction and process execution capabilities; they combine characteristics of smart analytics and artificial intelligence. These services can include front-office facing elements (e.g., conversations with end customers) and internal employee use cases (e.g., help desk, HR onboarding, assisting contact center agents).These cognitive assistants can self-learn, self-remediate, and execute business processes. They can also often understand structured and unstructured data and then use natural language processing to learn, comprehend, and recommend next steps. Advanced cognitive assistants can also enable predictive decision making using real-time analytics. This distinction is significant as many people use the terms “cognitive agents” and “chatbots” synonymously. While cognitive agents are a less mature capability, interest and adoption are growing rapidly—and their impacts are far greater than traditional automated tools.

So who's delivering these services most effectively today?  Well, who better to consult that HFS customer experience connoisseur Melissa O'Brien, who's just launched the industry's first deep-dive report on the services market for these cognitive assistants:

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We based this research on interviews with 300 enterprise clients of IT and business services from the Global 2000 in which we asked specific questions about innovation and execution

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Posted in: Cognitive ComputingDigital OneOfficeIntelligent Automation

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