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Monthly Archives: Jul 2016

Who are the leading IT and BPO services firms in EMEA?

July 29, 2016 | Jamie Snowdon
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The Global majors: IBM, Accenture, and HP, still dominate the top of the list

These top 3 service providers are likely to remain in place in 2016, unless Atos and Capgemini can pull some more rabbits out of the hat, with additional acquisitions – this time focused on the EMEA market. This is not such a big leap of imagination, given the length of these firms’ recent acquisition trails. However, it is likely that HP (or whatever it becomes) will overtake Accenture when it adds in CSC's and, let’s not forget, Xchanging’s revenues over the course of the next year. Although, given IBM and HP's recent weak growth performance, we expect Accenture to be the fastest growing of the top 3 over the next year, particularly given its recent strong financial performance, most notably last quarter’s double-digit growth, and its broader set of digital capabilities, beyond bread-and butter IT apps and infrastructure.

Atos and Capgemini remain close in revenue terms in Europe, and both firms seem to share similar sets of challenges and goals, albeit from slightly different perspectives – both are focusing management effort on growth in the US. Atos is bearing down and trying to solidify its position in the infrastructure management space, with software defined datacentre led approach. Capgemini is building on its broad consulting skills by building out specific industry capabilities and leveraging its IGATE assets. Simply put,both are vying to be their customers’ guide to the  digital promised land, but taking different routes to take them there. Both firms show strong growth in the first half of 2016 (Capgemini 15.6% and Atos at 17.9% constant currency) as they continue to integrate the finances of the recent acquisitions. Additionally, the providers grew organically, 1.9% for Atos and 3.3% for Capgemini.

Capita consistently remains the biggest BPO player in EMEA, although most of its revenues are from the UK and Ireland markets (we estimate >95% revenue). Recent half-year financials showed a 5% growth, over its 7% growth in 2015. Over the last couple of years, Capita has started to focus on expansion into Europe, with the acquisition of Avocis at the start of 2015 - its biggest commitment to this strategy so far.  With the emergence of the competitive Genpact as a serious contender for European BPO deals, Capita is being forced to broaden beyond the English-speaking customer base to avoid losing further market share.  Brexit has not dampened its enthusiasm for the expansion. Management comments regarding Brexit echoed those made by TCS and Infosys, some potential short-term uncertainty, but likely medium term gains and we all gain clarity of what’s in store.

There is a stark contrast between the EMEA provider list and the North American list (which we are publishing next week, so watch out for a blog). The EMEA list contains far fewer offshore-centric firms, which still depend on English-speaking centric services for the lion’s share of their business. Both Cognizant and TCS are top 5 players in the North American market, but in EMEA only TCS has managed to claim a Top 15 spot. The UK list would feature most of the big five players, as well as a strong showing from TechMahindra. Although there has been some emerging success outside of the UK for all of the other offshore firms, TCS has been the only one to gain genuine scale, thanks to its focus on localisation and more entrepreneurial approach to expansion. Although, all of the firms have had some success in the Nordics, most notably HCL with its huge Volvo and Nokia wins, but TCS has been the only offshore firm to generate significant traction in continental Europe.

Bottom Line: Europe is still a battleground for the Traditional Service Providers, but expect their Indian-centric counterparts to become more prominent as global markets consolidate

The EMEA market is still a hugely important market for all of the Global services firms, and there are plenty of opportunities given its non-homogeneous nature. The reality of the matter is simply that EMEA is not one market. Indeed, the European Union is not one market – look at the relative success of the offshore providers, outside of the UK and the Nordics. The differing national markets all have a distinct character and require different capabilities from their service provider organizations, such as local regulatory, compliance, data privacy, labour laws and accounting expertise.  Many of the individual European countries have specific laws governing where data resides and whether processes can be executed outside of said country.  This is especially evident when you look at smaller scale clients, which need specific attention the large providers simply cannot scale down to support profitably. So as experience in Europe increases we expect to see the other offshore providers, in addition to TCS, scale up across the continent, especially as the English-speaking markets becoming increasingly overheated for commodity IT and BPO services. For the top 15 list itself, we expect a few changes further down the list, including with the entrance of SopraSteria or Arvato in addition to the boost to HP from CSC and Xchanging.

Posted in: Business Process Outsourcing (BPO)IT Outsourcing / IT Services

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Outcome-based Contracts Are A Nightmare – Do Them Anyway

July 28, 2016 | Christine Ferrusi Ross

The services industry, and technology industry, are full of ideas that keep coming around. And they often fail several times before they finally succeed. Cloud is a great example, as the groundbreaking successor to hosting and before that timesharing. Many pundits saw the value of renting capacity instead of owning it. The market just needed a few iterations before we found a viable technological AND business model for it.

So here we are, in the services industry talking about outcome-based contracts. Again. Outcome based is pretty important at HfS Research: we think it’s transformative enough to be part of one of the eight ideals of the As-a-Service economy (digital plug and play services require an outcome-based model.) And of course, my first reaction when outcome-based discussion arise is “what’s different this time?”

Here’s what’s NOT different. Outcome-based contract negotiations are a mess. Mostly for some really important reasons in order of when you’ll likely come across them if you want to try outcome based:

  1. You have to know what an outcome is.  Seems simple, and in some cases it might be. If you want to sign a BPO deal for claims processing, that’s not too hard. There’s a pretty standard definition of a claim, understanding of how to process it, and if it’s actually been processed. But if you’re going beyond basic transactional outcomes to broader issues like improved customer satisfaction or higher integrity in your supply chain, then you’ll need to spend a boatload of time defining an outcome properly.
  2. Worse than point one, you have to decide what outcomes matter. As soon as someone gets the idea to do an outcome based contract, someone else in your company will come along and ask “why this outcome? Why not that one?” These kinds of discussions bring out some nasty internal arguments. Because sure, everyone can agree that raising the stock price is important and good. But once you get into more operational metrics, every business unit and every executive has different opinions and priorities to get there. Balancing everyone’s priorities to make sure your contract focuses on the right outcomes is a mess.
  3. Then you’ll get into heated discussions about cause and effect. When you start to get into negotiations with your supplier, you’ll get into a debate about whether the supplier can claim victory in ALL instances, or only if the supplier can prove that the outcome was a direct result of its work. If an outcome happens, was it because of the service provider or external factors? Let’s say a supplier offers to reduce your supply chain costs by 15% through a consulting engagement and one of the categories in the engagement is fuel. The cost of oil drops and now your supply chain costs have dropped – having nothing to do with the supplier. This one will go around in circles for weeks.
  4. What does an outcome even cost, exactly? If you’re paying for outcomes with little-to-no knowledge of the supplier’s cost structure then you have no idea what you should be paying for that service. It’s like cloud – take this price or leave it. So maybe the price seems fair compared to what you think you’re spending internally. During the negotiation, your only real negotiation lever will be if the bid is competitive and you can compare across suppliers.
  5. Making services into a “black box” doesn’t wipe out your regulatory and legal obligations. During negotiations and continuously afterwards you have an obligation to vet suppliers for compliance to government regulation, making sure the supplier operates legally and ethically on your behalf, and follows appropriate security measures. You can’t wipe out this responsibility by saying you only get the outcome. If you only focus on an outcome, you can easily play the “I don’t care how you deliver it” card. But if your supplier achieves that outcome by using slave labor or being noncompliant with regulations, then you’re still liable since the supplier is part of your supply chain.
  6. Post contract, you’ll start to resent your supplier BECAUSE THEY SUCCEEDED. Let’s say the contract agrees to pay on an outcome like volumes of sales and then every time sales goes up you have to pay your supplier. It won’t take long for you to decide you’ve paid them enough, in fact probably paid them two times over what you would have paid in a traditional contract structure. And you’ll turn on your provider – who’s doing an amazing job! (Maybe you put in a stop-clause that agrees to pay on outcome up to a certain amount of money, but that’s more likely for consulting/project contracts than ongoing outsourcing ones.)
  7. Good luck during renegotiation. Remember the point about not knowing cost levers? Chances are your bargaining position will be even worse if you just want to renegotiate because without the competitive bids, you have no basis for comparison. Did the supplier use bots and completely automate the process to get the outcome? Are they primarily labor based? Some combination? If the supplier’s costs are going down, how can you know if you’re getting any of that savings back?

If that’s what’s the same, here’s what’s different: The As-a-Service economy depends on outcomes. Outcome-based contracts used to be something leaders did, and even then only in a few relatively rare situations. But now it’s becoming a requirement. Who has time in this fast moving world where everyone wants to just plug into partners and suppliers and go? Part of being plug-and-play means having an outcome pre-defined and ready to deliver.

No one has time for long complex negotiations. And even though today outcome-based contracts are long and laborious negotiation efforts, if we all keep working on them, we’ll get better at them. We’ll find ways to fix the problems I just listed. Just like timesharing, hosting and cloud, the idea is the right one. If we want to change our businesses and build a competitive future, then we need to start our contracts with the end in mind. We need to focus on what has to get done and not micromanage how it gets done. We’re getting closer as an industry all the time. HfS is working hard on research into this space right now. So when it happens, we’ll get there together.

Posted in: Procurement, Engineering & Supply Chain OutsourcingSecurity and RiskThe As-a-Service Economy

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The Kind Of “Food For Thought” The Services Industry Needs

July 28, 2016 | Reetika Joshi

Have you ever had a meal that tickled your intellectual curiosity, delighted your sensory perceptions and of course, sated your appetite? Challenged your concepts of what a restaurant should be and what it should deliver? That’s what Chef Grant Achatz and his team at Alinea, Chicago are trying to create— over and over again.  Much as I would like to have had the actual experience, it was while watching an episode of Chef’s Table that I saw eerily familiar themes– concepts we talk and write about in the services outsourcing industry everyday.

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Posted in: Business Process Outsourcing (BPO)Design Thinking

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Evaluating a Service Provider? Relevant Profiles at Last!

July 28, 2016 | Mike Cook

Fed up with 100 page profiles that focus on quantity as opposed to the key areas that really matter to you? If only there was something unbiased, concise, relevant and to-the-point that really helps us navigate sourcing providers’ key offerings and capabilities? 

One question that crops up, time and again when we speak with outsourcing buyers, is the need for easy to use resources to help identify and select the right provider for the right task. HfS is launching a new type of report that delivers buyers a view of an individual service provider’s capabilities across both horizontal and industry vertical offerings. This is in addition to our flagship blueprint reports, which provide sourcing buyers with a view of the relative performance of providers in a particular offering space.

These Buyers Guides will be (as the name suggests) focused on the research needs of service buyers vetting potential IT/BPO service partners, providing in depth, referenceable insight. The Guides will include service provider people, process and technology capabilities, key financials, client examples, excerpts from published HfS Blueprints, strength, challenges, analyst insight as well as maturity modeling on the Eight-Ideals of the As-a-Service Economy. All factors that influence buyer’s decision-making today but more importantly, future-proof tomorrow.

So keep an eye, for the first of the buyer’s guides, starting with Genpact. They should appear on www.hfsresearch.com over the next two weeks.  If you have any feedback or suggestions for buyers guides you’d like to see, please reach out as these are always welcome.

Posted in: Business Process Outsourcing (BPO)Buyers' Sourcing Best PracticesIT Outsourcing / IT Services

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The Hitchhikers Guide to Intelligent Automation, Part I

July 27, 2016 | Tom Reuner

Long before it was turned into Hollywood film, Douglas Adams’ The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy was one of my favorite books. It reminds me of the unburdened days of my youth when the book’s one liners and quotes were secret code among my friends. Among them was “42” as the answer to the ultimate question of life, the universe, and everything, calculated by an enormous supercomputer named Deep Thought over a period of 7.5 million years. To explain the meaning and the vision of Intelligent Automation, I wish I could throw a “42” at you.

Problem is, there are no simple answers.

To learn more about the complexity around the notion of Intelligent Automation, HfS has launched the inaugural Intelligent Automation Blueprint. Over the next several weeks I will share some of the learning from that project with you, starting with Capgemini today.

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Posted in: Robotic Process Automation

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The HfS BPO Top 50: ADP, Xerox and Accenture lead the way

July 26, 2016 | Phil Fersht

Ever wondered who the leading 50 BPO providers are across the globe, when we add up all relevant revenues?  Well, you need look no further:

Source: HfS Research 2016 estimated from services provider financials. Revenues are fitted to nearest calendar year. We attempt to make the BPO services numbers as close to HfS definitions as possible. The market primarily used for this list is the horizontal BPO processes of F&A, HR, Customer Care/CRM, and Procurement. Some industry-specific back office processes are included but we have excluded specialist categories, for example, banking securities.

We have segmented the providers into 5 broad categories: HRO specialists, Customer Care specialists, Multi-process BPO, Multi-process IT & BPO and document management providers. The specialist areas: document management, customer care and HRO should be fairly clear—the vast majority of the services these company provides in BPO is related to this category. The IT multi providers and BPO multi providers—divides the companies that provide multiple types of BPO services into those with an IT heritage and those without. These categories are subjective; we based these splits partly on the type of services they provide and individual company background. For example, Accenture provides multiple types of BPO service and has a sizable IT services business so we have described as a IT multi.

HfS subscribers can download the full report, authored by Jamie Snowdon, Barbra McGann and Phil Fersht by clicking here

Posted in: Business Process Outsourcing (BPO)

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More than just a job

July 26, 2016 | Khalda De Souza

Paris headquartered Workday specialist service provider, everBe, recently announced the opening of a new ‘Global Excellence Service Centre’ in Bordeaux, France. everBe selected Bordeaux from a list of 10 locations, because, to quote the CEO, Jean Manaud:

“Finding a location where our staff could raise families and enjoy a quality life was a major criteria for us.”

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Posted in: IT Outsourcing / IT Services

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The next Steve Jobs iPhone moment? Pokemon Pokes at the Future of Augmented Reality in Engineering

July 25, 2016 | Pareekh Jain

I started playing Pokemon in college. More or less at the same time, I watched my first sci-fi movie Minority Report, which blew my mind and I started imagining the role of many futuristic technologies including augmented reality (AR). I could have never imagined, 14 years later, the combination of these two (Pokemon and Augmented Reality), Pokemon Go would become such a craze, adding $7 billion to a company’s valuation in just a couple of days. It also leads me to think again about the use of AR in engineering services.

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Posted in: Procurement, Engineering & Supply Chain Outsourcing

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Is Infosys really doing that badly? Let’s cut Vishal a break... for now

July 25, 2016 | Jamie Snowdon

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Posted in: Business Process Outsourcing (BPO)IT Outsourcing / IT Services

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Innovation: Did you get any?

July 24, 2016 | Khalda De Souza

Innovation: Did you get any?

Buyer: “This service provider delivered no innovation, thought leadership, or long-term best practice management advice for my business process.”

Me: “Did you ask them for any of this?”

Buyer: “Erm….no.”

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Posted in: SaaS, PaaS, IaaS and BPaaS

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HfS: The Silver Lining in Cloud Applications Services Research

July 22, 2016 | Khalda De Souza

So it’s finally happening. Enterprises are using SaaS applications to run important processes, such as CRM, HR and even Finance. Moreover, some even have an enterprise cloud strategy that requires departments to consider cloud options alongside on premise solutions, as part of process transformation projects.  

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Posted in: SaaS, PaaS, IaaS and BPaaS

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So Market Boy! How will Brexit really impact the services market?

July 22, 2016 | Jamie Snowdon

This is a question you expect to get as a forecaster, and it is not always the easiest to answer. It is always troubling to be asked to speculate on a market size where the outcome is so uncertain. However, this is not speculation upon speculation. This is not like forecasting the impact of Grexit (Greek exit from the EU) – even though this has not happened.

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Posted in: Business Process Outsourcing (BPO)IT Outsourcing / IT Services

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Accenture, Wipro, TCS and Cognizant lead the HfS 2016 Mortgage As-a-Service Blueprint

July 20, 2016 | Reetika Joshi

Two years after our inaugural Blueprint in Mortgage BPO Services, we took a fresh look at this industry…here’s announcing the findings of the HfS 2016 Mortgage As-a-Service Blueprint!

The concept of delivering mortgage As-a-Service, using plug and play digital business services is still in its infancy. We’re not quite at “push button, get mortgage” as an industry – and the verdict is out on whether this is the right message to send for a lending environment that is still rebuilding itself, seven years after the 2008 housing crash. How do you do this without raising eyebrows? You’ll have to ask Quicken Loans, as they learn from the backlash of their Super Bowl campaign with that very slogan.

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Posted in: Business Process Outsourcing (BPO)HfS Blueprint Results

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A Wow! Moment: Taking Patient Centricity To Heart To Impact Health Outcomes

July 20, 2016 | Barbra McGann

We hear a lot about the cost of healthcare, among these being the high cost of additional treatments or elongated stays when patients fall in hospitals, and of readmissions when people who go home after treatment don’t follow care plans. It’s amazing to think that a solution could involve something as simple, cost effective, and comfortable as clothing, such as a garment made with Hitoe® (That’s hee-toe-ay, not high-toe!).

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Posted in: Healthcare and Outsourcing

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Accenture buys MOBGEN: indigestion ahead?

July 20, 2016 | Oliver Marks

The world’s largest consulting firm by revenue, Accenture, has announced the purchase of 160-employee MOBGEN, which provides user experience-focused end-to-end digital services, with an emphasis on mobility strategy, creativity, and technology. The company is based in Amsterdam in the Netherlands and has offices in Spain. Accenture has been on a roll purchasing revenue-generating assets, and this addition to Accenture Digital is intended to “deliver rapid iterations for advanced mobile and IoT services,” and “strong roadmaps, agile development capabilities and scalable solutions” for European clients.

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Posted in: Digital TransformationMobilityOneOffice

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What does Coca-Cola teach us? Sell the Lifestyle. Don’t Sell the Drink. Millennial Recruiting and Retention Lessons from the World of Advertising.

July 20, 2016 | Mike Cook

It’s a well-established fact that in many first world countries there is currently a severe skills shortage. In my last blog, Why Brexit will create an even worse serious skills crisis in the UK – but could also create new opportunities longer-term, I broke out the real world facts of this crisis in the U.K. jobs market.

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Posted in: HR Strategy

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It's cognitively conjugal as Amelia and Accenture renew their vows

July 19, 2016 | Phil Fersht

The most "tangible" value of cognitive automation, in today's consumer-centric enterprise, is the use of the virtual agent, where customer engagement is increased without heavy incremental investments in support staff. This isn't about simply replacing a real customer service rep with an avatar, it's augmenting the existing customer experience, usually using the same or similar resources.  

For example, if you have a bad travel experience, or purchased a product that wasn't quite what you expected, the chances are you would simply shrug it off and get on with your life - and probably avoid using those same sellers again in the future, if given the choice. However, if those sellers used interactive technologies that were very familiar, or very easy to find and use, where you could simply type in your issue, in your own time, without the need to pick up a phone and wait in some queue (or write some email to some anonymous address), you may just find the effort to input a couple of lines saying "my experience just wasn't that good". 

That information is critical to the seller - and how they choose to deal with it could make the difference between them winning out or losing in this market.  Just think about how easy Uber, AirBnb, Amazon et al make it for you to deal with them - you will continue to use those services because the digital customer experience is just so much better... they make you feel like they listen.   Customers today like effortless interaction, where they just need to click and type what they want in their own time - and what makes it come alive is when they feel they are engaging with someone and not merely sitting in a queue as an open help desk ticket number waiting to be closed. 

If you get a chance to kick the tyres with one of the most exciting cognitive virtual agent solutions, IPSoft's Amelia, you start to realize that customer service can be radically improved by incorporating the virtual agent to augment the real one.  And the beauty of this is, the sellers do not need to spend huge incremental sums to increase their consumer engagement - they are essentially doing a lot more with what they currently have using smart cognitive technology.  

So it's no surprise that I got just a little bit excited when Amelia's mothership enterprise, IPSoft, announced a comprehensive partnership with Accenture to build an industry leading practice in the cognitive customer experience.  So sit back, relax, and enjoy this discussion between myself, IPSoft's CEO, Chetan Dube and Accenture's Chief Technology Officer, Paul Dougherty.

Phil Fersht, HfS CEO and Chief Analyst: So let's get straight to the point here, Chetan and Paul. Why have you come together and what is so unique about this partnership? 

Paul Daugherty, CTO, Accenture
Paul Daugherty, Chief Technology Officer, Accenture

Paul Daugherty, CTO, Accenture: Hi Phil - great to be here. Let me start and then Chetan can add in. You know that the immediate reasons we've come together, the obvious reason we came together is we see a real market with our enterprise clients for artificial intelligence based solutions. And we've been working with Chetan the team at IPsoft for a while and with Amelia we see a real potential to be at the vanguard of working with IPsoft  to pioneer new use cases in terms of using AI to tackle business problems in a new way. So the first reason is we see the market we see the technology being ready. We are excited about what IPsoft  has done with Amelia and we see an opportunity. I guess, stepping back from that, this is also to me a very important step in what we are seeing in the evolution of enterprises really transforming to the digital economy.

And Chetan will remember a lunch we had when we met for the very first time. We got very excited as we talked to each other a couple of years ago about what we saw as AI evolved and as the digital technology revolution continued, we saw a point coming where AI would allow companies to really rethink the way that they do business and rethink the way that they conduct business processes within their organizations. And that's I guess why this is such an important relationship from my perspective strategically, because we are starting to see as we move through the digital revolution as we help clients transform they need new approaches and new solutions to deal with the speed of business, to deal with the masses of data that they have, to deal with the new demands that they have as they move to the digital wave. And we see Amelia really serving a purpose there and helping to really rethink and revolutionize the way we conduct some of the business processes. That’s the way I’d answer it. Chetan, I’d be interested in your view on it, too.
 

Chetan Dube, CEO, IPsoft
Chetan Dube, CEO, IPsoft

Chetan Dube, CEO, IPsoft: Yeah. I would echo what Paul said. Yes, I remember that lunch, Paul, when we had brainstormed. AI is totally disrupting everything. But what is required for true value creation for the companies? Some have realized tremendous value and the others have been somewhat slow to realize value creation in their digital quest. What is required? Well, you do need the digital labor component.

But that's not all that you need. You need business transformation—and Accenture brings business transformation brilliance. And there are many companies that are experts in strategies and there are many companies that are experts in implementation. Accenture is one that amalgamates both. Couple that with cognitive technologies and you have the potential of realizing the true outcomes that were promised by the digital age. So that's what brought us together. How high the technology is going to allow some people to soar is going to be determined by the people who are captaining the ship. And in this case we have an incredible deal of confidence in Paul and his team at Accenture and how much transformation they will be able to bring by harnessing true cognitive abilities together.

Phil: So Chetan, for our global audience which might not be so familiar with Amelia, can you briefly summarize its value and potential? What can Amelia do which other cognitive solutions cannot?

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Posted in: Cognitive ComputingRobotic Process Automation

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Five must-have traits for Leaders

July 19, 2016 | Bram Weerts

People love status; that's just the nature of the beast. But wanting something and then going out and getting it can be an insurmountable hurdle. So sometimes people need to clarify what they want and why they want it. If you see yourself as a leader, have a quick look at the "five questions mirror." If you can't get past this list honestly, save yourself some time. You’re not a leader. That’s not all bad—you can still do something cool and be popular some place.

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Posted in: HR Strategy

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Make in India is Making India an Engineering Hub

July 18, 2016 | Pareekh Jain

Our research shows that India is the most popular destination for ER&D centers and now we’re seeing Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s “Make in India” program accelerate ER&D center investments in India.

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Posted in: Procurement, Engineering & Supply Chain Outsourcing

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OneOffice or DumbOffice? Service providers are bifurcating again

July 16, 2016 | Phil Fersht

In the old days of labor arbitrage centric outsourcing (which of course doesn't happen anymore) we had two quite clearly defined sets of service provider -

  • The offshore providers, which rarely interacted above director level and did the low end lift and shift routine work.
  • The integrators, which worked primarily with the IT and operations leadership to do the higher end work the ERP integration, often overseeing some of the offshore service providers to make sure they were doing their job. 

Then the likes of Accenture, IBM and Capgemini realized the offshore firms had eaten their lunch and they rolled out their own offshore delivery functions in 2005-2010 to circumvent the heavy flow of dollars to the Indian-centric majors. Accenture and IBM managed to catch up and compete on price when they needed to, while Capgemini really needed to acquire IGATE last year to be more effective as an offshore provider, in addition to being an integrator. Meanwhile, you had the likes of Deloitte, PwC and E&Y, which chose to stay out of the offshore game and sell integration capabilities as consultants, rather than managed service outsourcers. The losers in all of this were the traditional IT/BPO services providers, such as HP(EDS), CSC, Xerox(ACS) et al whose lunch was eaten by the offshore providers, struggling to compete on price, scale and flexibility.

Then along comes Digital and Automation as the new value drivers and suddenly the game is changing again – labor arbitrage is still a key cost lever, but it needs to be balanced with automation to drive down the cost and increase the productivity even further, while the broader goals of the ambitious C-Suites are to create real digital capabilities to create their markets, not play constant catch up to avoid being disrupted.:

So what are these two emerging groups of service provider?

OneOffice Enablers - focused on designing and enabling the digital customer experience and tying the front to the back to make it all happen (see below).  This is

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Posted in: Business Process Outsourcing (BPO)HfSResearch.com HomepageIT Outsourcing / IT Services

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