Monthly Archives: Jul 2018

Why AA's investment windfall locks up the RPA market for the Big Three

July 02, 2018 | Phil Fersht

 

We've now seen three pretty small software firms demonstrate 20x valuations... Blue Prism went public on the London Stock Excheng, UiPath received $150m in series B funding and Automation Anywhere has now announced $250 in series A funding.  So it's pretty clear there are three established leaders at the front of the RPA market and investors are convinced that RPA is the start of something much bigger for enterprises. Not only that, it's becoming pretty clear that the barriers to entry are high, and we're unlikely to see new players bulldoze their way into this space in the foreseeable future. So why is this?

RPA is kick-starting the true digital journey for many enterprises by helping create a digital process baseline

People love to espouse that RPA has quickly become commodotized and we'll barely be talking about it in another year, when we all suddenly become experts so good at building algorithms, we can actually train systems to build their own algorithms on the fly. Suddenly, RPA will be some pervasive capability that is so devoid of value, it will disappear somewhere into insignificance. Utter garbage: anyone who's got deep into RPA and tried to incorporate it into processes knows immediately that this type of thinking is naive, and likely coming from someone with no experience of the real world outside of their ivory tower. Firstly, RPA and RDA are not apps you sell to IT people to "rollout", they are low-code solutions, designed for business operators to replicate, fix and digitize their manual processes, or scrape "static" data from screens to integrate into a dynamic workflows. And secondly, "low-code" does not mean "no code".  Talk to anyone with RPA battle-scars and they will tell you about the amount of code customization that was needed in certain areas. 

Digital today is all about an enterprise being able to respond to the needs of its clients as an when those needs happen. Today's RPA and RDA provides integral building blocks that digitizes processes to enable businesses to process the data they need to have business operations support customer needs in real-time. Sure, they may simply be performing dumb tasks, such as running process workflows in recording loops, or scraping data from screens into automated scripts.

The commodization of RPA breeds familiarity - and familiarity breeds innovation.  The market is already established

Commoditization is good for bots, but remember that most enterprise folks have had to train to use the products and we already have very loyal followings for AA, Blue Prism and UiPath.  The tech needs to be simple, low-code and easy to install, scalable and manageable.  Noone wants highly customized solutions these days, so please do not confuse the devaluation of commoditization with the value of familiarization.  You think Workday and Salesforce are not "commodity" apps?  They are successful because they have crushed their markets through effective channel relationships, the creation of cult-like followings and years of building familiarity with their customers.  I've even heard of HR people threatening to quit their jobs if their firms refused to invest in Workday - it's an important part of their entire career path.  You think you can't find quality alternatives to Saleforce, such as ZoHo and Hubspot that are lower cost and even better in some areas, or likewise for Workday with SAP Successfactors and Ultimate? I predict we are already settling on AA, Blue Prism and UiPath as the RPA platforms of choice, as so many business users have already been through the pain barrier of training to understand the whole RPA paradigm.  We'll actually see more "micro-solution" firms, such as Thoughtonomy, which is building a service layer over Blue Prim and reselling that solution with positive results.  Another example is Antworks, which is impressing a lot of people with its data ingestion capabilities and integration with automation needs.

AA, Blue Prism and UiPath already have 700-1000 customers each (depending on what you believe) and have energized many new careers for many people - it can take a couple of years for non-IT people to really learn these products (and many experiment with at least two of them).  This market is only going to get stronger and more robust over the next three years - and beyond that, it's really all science fiction as we observe the speed of development and macro changes to our business environments. Like with all other technology-driven markets where the key stakeholder is the business executive, once they are familiar with a platform, getting them to retrain on something else is a massive effort.  Remember WorkFusion's attempts to offer "free RPA"?  People don't want something just because it's cheap - or even free, they want some skin in the game. 

The Bottom-line: Today's "Dumb RPA" provides a baseline for the development of intelligent bots in the future

You have to start somewhere, and for enterprises fixing their manual process messes, these three tools have provided the answer, with 70% of Global 2000 clients now expressing satisfaction, according to our new 2018 State of Operations study results.  However, if these firms rest on their laurels, this market dominance will be short lived.  Once the digital baseline is created, enterprises need to create more intelligent bots to perform more sophisticated tasks than repetitive data and process loops. Basic digital is about responding to clients as those needs occur, while true OneOffice is where enterprises need to anticipate customer needs before they happen (see below).  This means having unattended and attended interactions with data sources both inside and outside of the enterprise, such as macroeconomic data, compliance issues, competitive intel, geopolitcal issues, supply chain issues etc.  

Click to Enlarge

So we have some clarity for now with three dominant solutions, and enterprises can invest more in learning these tools with more certainty and peace of mind. Some stability, after so much change in the world of business operations, is more than welcome.  Now let's hope these firms will wisely invest in taking their products into the world of intelligent bots, and not splurge all the newfound capital on yet more sales and marketing. 

Posted in: Robotic Process AutomationIntelligent Automation

18

1 Comments

Concentrix gets up close and personal with Teleperformance with its Convergys acquisition

June 29, 2018 | Phil FershtMelissa O'Brien

One of the worst-kept secrets in the world of call centers finally went from gossip to reality as Synnex Corp added Convergys to its acquisition portfolio to roll under Concentrix.  As we covered here in 2013, IBM spun out its call center business to the Concentrix brand and - almost five years on - will merge forces with Concentrix under the leadership of Chris Caldwell (recently interviewed here).

So, from 10,000 people (just 5 years ago) to being very close behind the market leader, let's see how the call center market is shaking out right now:

Let's just get right to the nub here... what's good and not-so-good about this lovely marriage?

Pros

  • The price tag is extremely attractive - especially when compared to $1 bn for Intelenet, which is a much less heritage firm in the market.  At these investment levels, this appears like an amazing deal for Synnex, especially with its track record of making sound investments over the past couple of decades.
  • We now have a very strong rival to Teleperformance at the top of the market.  If Teleperformance had made this move, it may have been game over for a lot of these firms.
  • Convergys was stuck and needed a new direction - and here is one with an exciting young firm.  Convergys is a great, traditional contact ctr firm, very dedicated to its craft, but has been hurt by  low-cost competition and struggled to maintain its edge in recent years.
  • Scale can be priceless in a commodity market. When an industry is commodotizing like call center, it's often better to operate at a larger scale, so you can ringfence your legacy business and invest in strategic clients who want to work with a co-investment mentality. Geographical expansion and diversification will help the merged entity drive greater cost synergies and variety for clients.
  • Similar business ethos. As both core contact center service providers, both have a strong global operating model for consistency of services as well as a training and employee-focused culture. The challenge will be integrating the two together, but are generally aligned in terms of employee centricity and ops excellence.
  • Convergys has a very loyal client base that identifies with the firm, its culture, understanding of call center agents, and its understanding of their needs.
  • Microsoft partnership. Convergys has a very promising partnership with Microsoft and capabilities to harness Cortana and other apps.  CNX will need to nurture this relationship.
  • Good technology assets. Convergys brings a solid IVR business and some very popular agent portal platforms.
  • Gives Concentrix strong market visibility and helps shed its "we used to be IBM" tag. For Concentrix, this could help them carve out the message of what they’re doing and want to be in the market. For Convergys, lends some sense of direction in the post Andrea Ayers era.
  • An injection of fresh thinking and new ideas.  Chris Caldwell has a terrific opportunity to take his ideas to a very significant level if he can get this right, especially with acquisitions such as Tigerspike in the digital design space, and Minacs in marketing analytics and support.  Chris has a bold view of where the industry needs to go - this should be a terrific challenge for him and his team.
  • M&A can buy time to take control in a commodity marketplace. Large mergers like this create the perfect distraction to make some discreet investments, keeps the shareholders at bay for a few quarters and can (potentially) help them focus on retooling the offerings and sharpening the whole approach. However, this depends entirely on decisive leadership and swift, focused transition and very strong communication to investors and shareholders.

Cons

  • Is bigger really better? This acquisition seems to be more about bolstering scale and size, with Convergys having little to show in terms of proprietary IP or differentiated offerings (Contrary to Concentrix's investments in Tigerspike and Minacs). However, in a market that has been largely stagnant for years, any movement like this can help shake things up.
  • Convergys lacks a diversification in clientele with AT&T/Comcast being an enormous piece of CVG’s business. Telcos are typically the epitome of butts on seats deals—why choose a company that’s practically half telcos?  Maybe this explains why the price was so attractive.
  • Client overlaps in large accounts will impact some revenues, i.e. Cisco.
  • The potential for culture clash. Concentrix comes out of IBM business and Convergys is essentially a traditional telco out of Cincinatti Bell … one has a background of tech and innovation and the other a very conservative and risk-averse culture. 
  • Convergys’ revenues have been decreasing the last couple of years.  Call volume fluctuations and trying to compete with cost-focused customers and several butts-in-seats service providers in low-cost geos, has made it very challenging to focus on value-based deals.
  • Appetite for automation in Convergys core industry puts ever more pressures on sustain margins and growth. For example, Convergys' strongest vertical, telcos, are increasing their self-service interactions and automation, and have the strongest appetite in the industry for increasing Robotic Process Automation investments, in addition to their outsourcing focus.
  • Desperate mid-tier providers. Many of the midtiers service providers may make the whole situation worse, by forcing price points even lower out of sheer desperation. Let's be honest, we're in a rat-race and the game is all about who can survive the next 18-24 months to emerge ontop.  
  • Low-cost IT/BPO offshore providers making subtle moves into the contact center space as digital customer needs accelerate. We're already seeing many of the Indian heritage firms chasing after call center deals they would not have looked at a couple of years ago. They can be especially effective with "chat-only" engagements and with clients wanting to buy into a strong cognitive / automation story.  Large IT-centric outsourcers, such as Techmahindra, HCL  and Cognizant have been seen picking off some impressive wins with clients, especially where there are very strong IT elements.  BPOs such as EXL and WNS have been much more active in the customer service segment, and EXL is making an impressive repositioning of itself as a digital intelligence provider, with some impressive depth in insurance, utilities and healthcare sectors.

The Bottom-line: As long as this "traditional consolidation" is short-term, this could pave the way for a OneOffice future for the winning contact center providers

Let's cut to the chase here - Convergys is a great call center provider, but lacked the leadership and investment to break into the digital era effectively.  This merger may just provide that opportunity for a very talented employee base with a terrific customer culture.   For Concentrix, they needed one big play to get up-close-and-personal with Teleperformance, and this is the move.  Plus, the price was really damn good, and we're surprised why others with huge financial backing didn't make the move, such as Sitel or Arvato.

On the negative side, these contact center heavyweights appear to be doubling-down on size and scale, rather than pursuing a true OneOffice vision for digital customer engagement. We are more excited about some of the smaller acquisitions happening in the space, such as Webhelp’s recent Sellbytell acquisition from Omnicomm and SYKES’ pursuing digital marketing with Clearlink – connecting the pieces in the front office as marketing, service and sales continue to overlap and converge, and using the vast amounts of customer data they process to better engage with customers. 

The large contact centers can’t seem to get out of their own way—they talk about providing digital, analytics and CX consulting focused services, but the reality is that the bulk of their business is still traditional contact center. Despite some real capabilities, salespeople aren’t incentivized to sell a different way, and customers aren’t ponying up to partner and buy a different way.  Continuing in this paradigm is a short-sighted view… look at what is happening with eroding revenues from the telco sector now, the most mature of the contact centers will eventually happen in other sectors, such as retail and banking. In addition, the wave of "chat only" deals are increasing and threatening the life out of the traditional voice business. Providers like Teleperformance and Concentrix don’t have to disown their core business – there’s always going to be a huge market for traditional interaction management, however, adding some truly differentiated digital offerings would be a much smarter long-term strategy.

Net-net, this is a massive coup for Synnex and the Concentrix management teams - and Convergys has found a good home to focus on the future with confidence.  However, we would like to see some significant investments in intelligent automation and digital technologies to drag contact center BPO into the OneOffice era. Let's hope these guys can work it out, as there is a real war on between the legacy cost-obsessed approach and the OneOffice approach...

Posted in: Contact Center and Omni-ChannelDigital OneOffice

6

1 Comments

The definitive RPA product benchmarks: The overall picture across 359 superusers

June 24, 2018 | Phil Fersht

In case you've been asleep for the last month, we recently announced the industry's most comprehensive analysis (by far) of RPA product functionality, covering AntWorks, Automation Anywhere, BluePrism, Kofax, Kryon, NICE, Pega, Thoughtonomy, UiPath, and Workfusion.

Premium HfS subscribers can access the HfS Benchmarking Report: Detailed Assessment of the 10 Leading RPA Products here

We interviewed 359 superusers of RPA products (172 enterprises, 87 RPA advisors and 100 service provider RPA practitioners) across 40+ customer experience dimensions across the following 6 key dimensions: 

  1. Features and functionality
  2. Integration and support
  3. Security and compliance
  4. Flexibility and scalability
  5. Embedding intelligence
  6. Achieving business outcomes

Here is how the overall satisfaction for RPA customer experience came out looking across the products

Click to Enlarge

 Key Highlights

  • RPA’s core functionality works but deployments are not as easy as promised.
  • RPA products offer adequate client support and training but IT skills are required. Some RPA products have made significantly more investments than others around client support.
  • Most RPA products performed well on security and compliance related assessment.
  • RPA products have shown satisfactory flexibility but clients are still confused about pricing models.
  • RPA products are not as intelligent as they claim to be (at least not yet!).
  • RPA satisfaction is middling. Clients have largely realized cost savings, but speed-to-market has not met expectations.

Take time to delve into the realities of RPA and some of the findings may just surprise you:

Premium HfS subscribers can access the HfS Benchmarking Report: Detailed Assessment of the 10 Leading RPA Products here

Posted in: Robotic Process AutomationIntelligent Automation

0

0 Comments

You just can't lose... with Chris Boos. Time for an AI reality check

June 22, 2018 | Phil Fersht

There aren't too many people you can listen to today where you feel all those sticky layers of hype just fall away from your brain, as this guy actually knows what he's talking about and (as we English love to put it) he just doesn't mince his words. So, after a terrific meeting with Hans-Christian (Chris) Boos, Founder, and CEO of leading AI platform vendor arago, I pinned him down to share some of his views with the HfS crowd...

Phil Fersht (Founder and CEO, HfS Research): Chris - you've been a terrific guy who adds so much energy and colour to the intelligent automation industry... but can you shed a little light on your story?  How did you find yourself setting up the business in 1995?  Was the focus on intelligent automation back then?  I thought we were all going nuts about ebusiness!

Chris Boos (Founder and CEO, Arago):  Phil - I originally wanted to do AI research at a university and then I saw how slow academic research is today with the way it is financed. I chose to do it inside a company instead. We could control the pace there. We setup arago to research general AI and my belief has always been that general AI is all about automation. If it is intelligence – even the quite boring artificial version – I guess you could say that smart automation was my goal, then.

Most people are surprised about the research phase. But if you look at most people who are doing significant work in AI they all plan or have done a roughly 20-year research phase. The

Read More »

Posted in: Cognitive ComputingIntelligent Automation

10

1 Comments

Accenture, IBM, Cognizant, Infosys, Wipro and TCS lead the first Digital OneOffice Blueprint

June 10, 2018 | Phil FershtMelissa O'BrienAnirudh PillalaSaurabh Gupta

Digital is all about an organization's ability to respond to the needs of their customers as those needs happen - or even be smart enough to anticipate those needs before they happen. This is all enabled by interactive technologies to create those touchless interfaces with the customers.  Smart analytics and AI enable organizations to anticipate these needs based on the ability to recognize patterns and inferences over time, but nothing can really substitute for human intelligence to bring customers, suppliers and employees closer together, unimpeded by frustrating silos and legacy processes. 

Remember, every broken process chain, or poorly converged dataset, slows down an organization's ability to do business in real-time and stay ahead of its market.  Traditional barriers between front, middle and back offices hinder the true ability of companies to operate in this real-time, responsive and anticipatory digital fashion, which is why we coined the term "OneOffice", where the unification of digital business models, intelligent automation, analytics and creative talent is happening before our very eyes.

The HfS Digital OneOffice Framework (see below) describes how organizations must integrate their digital customer interfaces with their operations in order to fulfill and anticipate their customers' needs. It is the organizational end-state to survive and succeed in a world where digitized processes dictate how responsive, agile, cost-effective, predictive and intelligent firms have to be to stay competitive.  

To this end, we have delved deep into all the four dimensions of the Digital OneOffice, and conducted deep analyst discussion to aggregate service provider performance at delivering the sum of the Digital OneOffice parts:  

  1. Digitally driven front office
  2. Digital underbelly
  3. Intelligent digital support functions
  4. Predictive digital insights

HfS Premium subscribers can click here to access their full copy of the 2018 Blueprint Report: Digital OneOffice Services

Click to Enlarge

So how did the Winner's Circle service providers fair?

Accenture

Strengths

  • Well-rounded portfolio across OneOffice: Accenture has the best performance overall across the OneOffice portfolio, and a breadth of industry expertise to complement it. Accenture placed in the Winners' Circle for each of the Blueprint studies used to compile this OneOffice assessment.
  • Strong marketing operations capabilities to support integrated digital OneOffice offerings.  Accenture has 16,000 business-focused staff dedicated to delivering digital marketing assignments - a considerable asset that goes well beyond the firm's IT delivery.
  • Strong intelligent automation capabilities. Acquisition of GenFour and exciting partnerships, with significant investments, with the likes of Automation Anywhere, Blue Prism and IPSoft.
  • Winning with thought leadership: Accenture is well-known as a thought leader across many of the change agents as well as within individual industries. 
  • C-Suite relationships beyond IT.  Digital business and intelligent automation decisions are largely being driven by both IT and business C-Suite executives in the Global 2000.  Accenture has the combination of strategic relationships outside of IT, in addition to the managed services execution. 
  • Leveraging creative assets for CX and UX design: Accenture has developed an industry-leading focus on becoming a customer experience expert, as evidenced by its 30+ design agency assets, by the broadest portfolio of digital design assets in the services industry (click here for a full list of digital M&A in services.)

Challenges

  • Size can work in its disfavor: Its size and success have given Accenture a reputation as a premium, high cost, and less responsive organization. In particular, for smaller companies, just this perception in the market can steer buyers instead toward more niche specialized agencies and the attention, flexibility, and experience they receive from a smaller provider.
  • Finding the right culture balance: Accenture is well known for its results-driven, traditional consultancy culture, which will need to be balanced out or effectively blended with the more left-brain focused acquisitions in order to retain creative talent and remain generally effective.
  • Proving to the industry it can deliver the end-to-end Digital OneOffice portfolio: There is no doubt that Accenture can pick up strategic work and execute for clients, but being able to demonstrate to the industry it can deliver both the strategic design integrated with complex operational delivery - at scale - is still in its infancy.  Many of its competitors will fight hard for execution work where Accenture is delivering the high-end design and consulting. It needs to demonstrate the "one-stop OneOffice shop" is where it wins.

IBM

Strengths

  • Strong intelligent OneOffice offering: Market leading capabilities to drive the OneOffice underbelly (automation, security, cloudification) and neural networks (AI, smart analytics, blockchain, and IoT). Impressive development of credible global automation capability and several notable early wins.
  • Portfolio breadth: End-to-end and scaled IT and business process services across front, middle, and back-office.
  • Horizon 4 investments: Very strong investments and IP in horizon 4 (and beyond) technologies that will shape the future (e.g., Quantum Computing).
  • Design Thinking: Has made some considerable investments in recent years, but needs to align more aggressively with OneOffice approach
  • Watson: The analytics/cognitive powerhouse has a significant role to play as a cognitive virtual agent, an analytics resource that has huge scalabiity and a long-term investment area for firms with deep interests in their cognitive capabilities.

Challenges

  • Size can be a disadvantage: IBM is a large and complex organization, which makes it hard to seamlessly deliver all that it has to offer.
  • Translating tech to business outcomes: IBM is often perceived as a technology powerhouse, but one lacking the business translation and context to successfully apply emerging technologies.
  • Agility: Lacks the nimbleness and flexibility of smaller players.
  • Focus on cognitive may impede its ability to compete for design-focused end-to-end deals:  IBM has substantial credibility to drive analytics-driven, cognitive/automation projects, but its lesser focus (over the last couple of years) on true digital design may see it lose out to firms such as Accenture and Cognizant, where digital is firmly established at their core.

Cognizant

Read More »

Posted in: Digital TransformationDigital OneOffice

2

1 Comments

To keep receiving HfS updates, make sure you register now!

June 10, 2018 | Phil Fersht

Still enjoying life now GDPR's cleaned up your inbox, but now realize HfS is the one you just cannot live without?

Let's be honest, you probably do need to keep up-to-date with the finest change-agent research on RPA, blockchain, AI, and much more, right? Then you really must register here to receive HfS' content, or update your email subscription to keep receiving us.

Posted in: Digital TransformationDigital OneOfficeIntelligent Automation

0

0 Comments

And time for a real Infosys Saliloquy...

June 07, 2018 | Phil Fersht

Salil Parekh, recently appointed CEO and Managing Director for Infosys took some time out of his busy schedule during his client partner conference to catch up with me to talk about his vision for all things Infosys and the future of services…

Phil Fersht, CEO and Chief Analyst, HFS Research: Welcome to your first HfS interview Salil! Maybe you could take us a little bit back to your early career. When did you get the appetite to lead one of the largest IT services firms in the world? You know, was this something you always wanted to do? Was this planned, or have you always been an opportunist?

Salil Parekh, CEO, Infosys: Thank you, Phil, this was quite an un-planned scenario for me. So, maybe when I finished with Engineering, a Master’s in Computer Science, and I was working with a consulting firm for years. Then we got acquired by a consulting and tech company, so I’d basically been in the same company for 25 years. And then this opportunity showed up a few months ago. It’s a tremendous privilege to have this opportunity. It’s one of those things you dream about, in your career, as you sort of think, ‘Maybe it’s possible,’ but when it happened, at least, for me, it was completely unplanned. So I’m delighted to be here, I wish I could plan such things, but I can’t [laughter].

Phil: So, how would you compare this new Infy experience with Capgemini, you know, both global services powerhouses, one with a Parisian epicentre, the other one Bangalorian, so – what haves been your observations?

Salil: Well, I think, Cap’s a fantastic company. I think I would focus much more on the strengths

Read More »

Posted in: Buyers' Sourcing Best PracticesDigital Transformation

0

0 Comments

Finally the industry has credible RPA product benchmarks from 359 superusers

June 01, 2018 | Phil Fersht

As am sure most of you noticed, HfS quietly released the most comprehensive customer satisfaction benchmarking of the 10 leading RPA solutions, authored by Saurabh Gupta, myself and Maria Terekhova.  We covered 359 super users of RPA products (enterprises, advisors and service providers) across 40+ customer experience dimensions across the following 6 key dimensions: 

  1. Features and functionality
  2. Integration and support
  3. Security and compliance
  4. Flexibility and scalability
  5. Embedding intelligence
  6. Achieving business outcomes

As an example, here is how dimension 6, "Business Outcomes" came out looking across the products:

So why did we undertake this research?

Our industry is plagued by many consultants with limited depth in RPA, who have no access to product level data that supports the tough decisions facing enterprises. In addition, most analysts deliver these 2 x 2 matrices which offer very limited insight or value (and all look remarkably similar). It’s time to dispel myths and provide enterprises with unbiased, credible and highly statistically significant data. The HfS RPA customer experience benchmarks are designed to help enterprises with RPA product selection as they formulate their intelligent automation roadmaps.  

It's more than a report... it's an online RPA decision-support tool

In addition to the report, HfS is also launching an online RPA decision-support tool for enterprises to enable client-specific due diligence on RPA providers. This tool will allow HfS clients to customize the decision criteria and associated weights from the available 40+ customer experience dimensions. It will provide clients a customized report detailing the top three RPA products that the client should consider, based on the rich insights that HfS collected as a part of the RPA study. HfS analysts are also supporting RPA clients through collaborative ThinkTank sessions, half-day workshops designed to problem-solve and validate strategies. These ThinkTanks go beyond the data where HfS analysts can share HfS IP, perspectives, and experiences on RPA tool selection, best practices, and common pitfalls to avoid.

So take time to delve into the realities of RPA and some of the findings may just surprise you

The industry is still struggling to solve challenges around the process, change, talent, training, infrastructure, security, and governance. Our mission at HfS is to dispel this confusion and uncover the truth to successful RPA deployment. It's time to separate the hype and propaganda from reality - and here is the reality!

Premium HfS subscribers can access the HfS Benchmarking Report: Detailed Assessment of the 10 Leading RPA Products here

Posted in: Robotic Process Automation

0

0 Comments

The G2000 is still cost-obsessed, but getting there now depends on process robotics, predictive data, OneOffice alignment and a whole lotta pain

May 27, 2018 | Phil Fersht

However which way we look at it, driving out costs from business operations still dominates the directives of C-Suites across the Global 2000 - just revisit our 2014 study to see how little has changed. Fast forward to today, and the only real differences, since then, are the methods to slake this thirst for cost elimination, as traditional operating models are no longer delivering much more than incremental value.

Our new State of Operations and Outsourcing Study, conducted with KPMG, covers the dynamics of 381 operations leaders from the Global 2000 and reveals these rapidly changing C-Suite directives to drive out their number one nemesis: cost.

Click to Enlarge

Traditional cost savings models are running out of steam, as robotics, predictive analytics, OneOffice and cognitive become the new operating value levers

Little tweaks here and there to delivery locations and headcount allocations are becoming less and less effective, as it becomes clear only the fundamental rewiring of underpinning data repositories - and the digitization of manual processes - are going to progress operations to a place where real efficiencies can be enjoyed. In addition to fixing data and manual processes that clearly hit that old cost button, C-Suites are also recognizing the dire need have their customer needs being addressed by their employees as and when they occur (OneOffice), and also to invest more in cognitive tech and machine learning to drive more value from their current pool of talent:

Click to Enlarge

Cost reduction mandates still fall well short, but expect to see them improve as data-driven initiatives bear fruit

The perennial issue here is clearly one where C-Suites rarely feel exhilarated by the cost reduction impact of their operations leaders.  Of all their mission-critical directives this year (see above), none disappoints them as much as their ability to impact cost reduction (only 28% are very satisfied), while there are much larger numbers of C-Suite leaders already a lot happier with their robotic process investments (40% 'very satisfied' and a further 30% 'satisfied').  However, as we continue to see this strong impact in these areas aligned to robotics, OneOffice, and predictive analytics, surely it's merely a test of time until we see these initiatives having greater visibility, in terms of ironing out unnecessary costs and inefficiencies in the system.

The Bottom-line: It's taken several decades, but our enterprises finally have no choice but to make fundamental changes to the very make up of their processes, data, and people if they are going to survive 

Ever since my first blog 11 years ago (right here), we've pretty much repeated the same conversation that's been continually refined over the years.  The only game changers have been the gradual need for less people to run operations as cloud-based software platforms take-hold, offshore talent is optimized, and the more recent introduction of robotic process automation solutions to remove manual workarounds and create broader digital processes, that can be aligned with common business outcomes and metrics. 

However, these changes are more fundamental than merely slimming down the number of cooks in the kitchen and making the food taste better:  it's forcing a complete rethink from ambitious firms to redesign operating frameworks where revamped business processes are enabling true digital business models, where emerging AI capabilities can be weaved in... where innovation is native to the culture of the firm and its people. Yes, it's redesigning the entire kitchen, not merely hiring some better chefs with better recipes. 

The toughest challenge is fixing many years of poorly-constructed data repositories, where the corporate IT ancestors that built them have likely long-since departed, and other IT stormtroopers from the midst of time have plastered on countless workarounds and spaghetti coding to keep the back end (somehow) functioning.  These are the deep, murky areas where it's frighteningly difficult for many firms to take the risk of investment and change to find their way out of the dark data ages.  Somehow ripping out the very fabric of what got you here is what you may have to do to survive in the future... and that can be one very painful, risky and costly experience.  Sure, you can keep papering over those yawning cracks, but the wallpaper just isn't working like it used to... 

Posted in: Analytics and Big DataDigital OneOfficeRobotic Process Automation

2

1 Comments

The why, the what and the how of the HfS Digital OneOffice

May 21, 2018 | Phil FershtSaurabh Gupta

We've talked a lot about the HfS Digital OneOffice operating framework - it's the HfS vision for the business operations endstate for digital organizations:

Click to Enlarge

The Digital OneOffice is where teams function autonomously across front, middle and back office functions to promote broader processes with real-time data flows that support rapid decision making. It’s where front, middle and back offices will cease to exist, as they will be, simply, OneOffice.

Why Digital OneOffice?

Digital organizations must have an operating framework that maps out how they have to operate in the future. Traditional operating models, while creating some incremental productivity value if managed effectively, struggle to drive the unification of digital business models with emerging technologies across a business's operations:

A true digital business cannot succeed without unifying front, middle, and back offices
Traditional approaches (organizational restructuring) have failed to have a purpose beyond incremental efficiency / productivity 
The Digital OneOffice is the organizational end-state to survive and succeed

What is the Digital OneOffice?

The Digital OneOffice focuses on real-time customer and employee engagement. OneOffice is:

Collaborative (Collective outcomes)
Unified (Without silos and hierarchies)
Dynamic (Agile and scalable)
Intelligent (Predictive, not reactive)
Responsive (Real-time)
Simple (Touchless and autonomous)

How to achieve Digital OneOffice?

The Digital OneOffice is the framework for achieving a true digital organization:

CX is not just fancy UI. Make CX the core of all your business operations from front to back.
Cost reduction is not a strategy. Drive organizational alignment and metrics that measure value creation, not only cost reduction. 
Weed out the people unprepared to change. Invest in an inclusive talent strategy, based people who want to learn and share.
Your tech infrastructure is everything. Automate, digitize, cloudify, and secure your organizational underbelly.
Build co-innovation relationships and shed legacy relationships. The partners who got you’re here may not be the ones to take you where you want to go.
Stop kicking the intelligent technology can down the road. It’s all here and now you need to make decisions on where you go with it
Stop thinking about the Future of Work. It’s already here...act now!

The Bottom-line: Traditional operating models have been focused on incremental improvements, not creating genuine frameworks for digital organizations

While traditional models such as outsourcing, shared services and global business services promote incremental efficiencies based on centralization of support functions and use of offshore to lower operating costs, none of these models have provided an ideal endstate for ambitious digital organizations.  Without having a true picture of how you want to operate in the future, you will be perennially be searching for short-term fixes to drive out further costs, and never be able to map out a strategic journey that will bring together your two most critical assets: your customers and employees.

Posted in: Digital TransformationDigital OneOffice

0

0 Comments

Is RPA officially the new outsourcing?

May 17, 2018 | Phil Fersht

Just as many enterprises were running out of places to find more and more hidden costs they could quickly remedy through (yet) more outsourcing, along came their perfect new toy to unearth costs they had never thought possible to eliminate: RPA.  

Yes, folks, this stuff is just the thing to keep you occupied for the next few years to keep your greedy CFOs at bay - and even includes the word "robot" to conjure up images of human work displacement, creating hours upon hours of repetitive (robotic) debate at conferences from people who literally sprung from seemingly nowhere to become lifelong experts in this new dark art. 

And, oddly, most of these new RPA maestros seem to be exactly the same people who were hawking the delights of outsourcing just a couple of years ago.  Maybe the connection between outsourcing and RPA is a lot closer than we think?  So let's have a gander at the new findings from the 2018 State of Operations and Outsourcing study, conducted with KPMG across 381 Global 2000 organizations, where we questioned operations leaders about their intentions to keep investing in RPA and outsourcing. 

This data shows the tranche of operations leaders making significant investments in RPA and outsourcing, sliced by industry sector:

Financial services firms, where outsourcing is most mature, are showing voracious appetites to go down the RPA path

While banks and insurers are showing the smallest appetite (10%) to keep pursuing aggressive outsourcing strategies, they are right at the front of the queue (50%) when it comes to RPA.  Insurers were one of the first industries to explore BPO and offshoring twenty years ago, so it's little surprise that RPA is so appealing to these firms, where they can find completely new ways to mimic highly repetitive, intensive processes, plagued by manual workarounds, using smart

Read More »

Posted in: Business Process Outsourcing (BPO)IT Outsourcing / IT ServicesRobotic Process Automation

21

1 Comments

Sticking to his Nitin

May 06, 2018 | Phil Fersht

Let's be honest, the services business needs dynamic leaders, if we're ever going to step up to being these innovators and true partners we keep claiming we are.

One such character I have enjoyed getting to know over recent years is Nitin Rakesh, who spent a good part of his earlier career at Syntel, eventually taking the CEO mantle for three years, until moving over to Mphasis just over a year ago, to revitalize the $1bn financial services focused IT services firm, which spent many years are part of HP, before being divested. 

Nitin is also very active in the thought leadership sphere as chairman of the IT services council for NASSCOM, and serves on the advisory broad for [email protected] (among other activities). But one of the things you'll get to know about Nitin is his brain typically works faster than most mortals, especially when it comes to his favorite topic about aligning technology to the needs of the customer, and working those desired outcomes right through to the back office, which is a philosophy very close what we believe in at HfS, with our Digital OneOffice conceptual framework

So let's hear a bit more from Nitin about how to get ahead in today's IT services industry, and what we need to do to be effective in the wake of intense competition and the leveling off of traditional IT services...

Phil Fersht, CEO and Chief Analyst, HFS Research: Good morning, Nitin. It's great to have you on here. To start with, I'd love to hear a bit more about you personally - you’re a technical guy, you're an engineer at heart. So how did you wind up running a billion-dollar IT services firm? Tell us where this all started and why you've been so successful at it.

Nitin Rakesh, CEO Mphasis: Thank you for that, Phil. I think I am an engineer at heart, I love building stuff. Early on I started experimenting with newer areas - as I came out of college, back in the days in the early '90s looking at how do you apply technology to things like image processing, character recognition. Those were very early days of artificial intelligence because you are teaching the software how to actually recognize handwriting.

So I think early on I got really excited about the impacts technology can have on our daily lives, and how we can change the world surely but certainly. I think from then I’ve never really looked back even though I've done a few stints in financial services. How do you apply technology and innovation? Back in the day, in the mid '90's, there was a field which is now also pretty prevalent called ‘Technical Analysis of the Markets’. And that was nothing but pattern recognition to see how do you analyze human behavior looking at the patterns in stock markets or their price behaviours.

So I think the theme started to get clearer to me over the years, but I've been lucky that I was at the right place at the right time as well. More importantly, I am really passionate about applying technology to everyday problems and ended up running a technology services company.

Phil: We got to know each other when you were at Syntel, but you've since taken over Mphasis, and now it's free of the HP empire (or former empire). So how is that business refocusing itself... and where are you taking it?

Nitin: I think this company has got some unique capabilities despite having gone through both shareholders in the last 12 years. I think we have retained and maintained our focus on applied technology. The company was founded by two ex-Citi bankers, so the focus was always applying tech to financial services and banking.

One of them was a business leader and the other one was a technical leader, a CTO. I think they built a techno-functional mindset into the business more than just a functional approach to applying problem-solving. I think it was always about embedded technology. And I think under EDS and HP, some them flourished, but some of them were impacted due to the overall global empire of HP, and the fact that we were a small piece of their overall business.

But as I came onboard about a year ago, we do have a fairly progressive shareholder who encouraged us to find our footing based on our areas of strength. What we've really been doing over the last 12 to 18 months is, essentially, differentiating ourselves by being an applied-tech firm that focuses on looking at how to apply new technologies to everything that banks, insurance companies and financial services firms do.

This is really about looking at, in the current age, how we make every enterprise customer-centric for their end customers and consumers, and how do you apply technologies to help them get closer to their customer in order to improve customer experience, reduce downtimes, offer targeted products and services with hyper-personalization?  And all of this at a lower cost, with a fast time to market. So that's kind of the mantra that we've set for ourselves.

Phil: A billion dollars in revenue: Surely, Nitin, that should be the ideal size to be big enough to be dangerous, but small enough to be sort of nimble and disruptive. What does this mean though, in reality? Can you share an example or two of how you can disrupt with your clients, while also delivering the bread-and-butter work that keeps the machine going?

Nitin: Absolutely Phil. That's a great positioning statement! We actually use a variation of that quite often. But I think our positioning almost always is that of a 'champion challenger". And from that, one, we obviously have the agility and the customer-centric focus on our side. We aim to give clients a personalized white glove service experience and we continue to invest significantly in our capabilities to stay ahead of the curve. In fact, there are multiple examples where we've been fairly nimble - but also aggressive - about going back to our clients and proposing to them things that challenge how they run their current operations, whether technology or business.

I'll give you a small example: Why should we not apply something like predictive analytics to an offering as standard as infrastructure application management? Why should we not turn AMS or an IMF into a big data analytics problem, and why should we wait for something to fail or break, so that we can go and fix it, which is (let's face it) the traditional IT outsourcing model?

So, I think, from that perspective, it means that we end up shrinking the overall footprint of the ITO team, but that's okay with us because I think that's the right thing to do for the customer. So, I think from our perspective, we've been fairly aggressive in moving clients along this journey of applying technology to traditional services as well.

And given that our scale is normally a fraction of some of the very large players, we are able to go back in and propose something very creative, even if it means that it actually shrinks the core and has an adverse impact on us as well. I just think that's the right thing to do. So that's how we are able to challenge the status quo, and in the process, carve out a position for ourselves.

Phil: One of the big discussion topics we talked about at our recent New York FORA summit centered on emerging technologies like automation, machine learning not being an end - they are just a means to get from one place to another. So, what are these places? What - in your view - is the real end-game for clients these days?

Nitin: Great question, Phil. I think I'm a big believer in the fact that every next technology isn't anything more than a tool, and what you do with it depends on how you are able to align it with one or two objectives. I talked about the fact that one of the biggest reasons why we are seeing fairly high degrees of disruption, especially in consumer-facing industries, is because, over the years, enterprises became so complex in the way they ran their back office systems and operations, that almost every business that's been around for 25-30 years is essentially run back-to-front what that means that the back office determines when you can launch the next product, the back office determines what's the next recycle for you to be able to make changes to your system, so you can have the new functionality.

The back office determines how much flexibility do you have, and so on and so forth. Whereas if you look at the new age, truly digital companies, they actually put the end customer in the middle of everything, and work backward from that. So how do you really pivot the focus of large enterprises from being functionally operationally back-office driven, to being customer-driven. And that's how you should think of applying all new technologies, whether it happens to be analytics, which should give you the ability to understand every customer, or whether

Read More »

Posted in: IT Outsourcing / IT Services

5

1 Comments

Offshore outsourcing died with Trump. Now value-based partnerships are rising from the ashes...

April 28, 2018 | Phil Fersht

What a difference an election makes.  When we ran our State of Operations and Outsourcing study in 2014 (mid-way through President Obama's final term), Global 2000 enterprises were still planning to increase their short-term investments in offshoring their IT by more than 20%.  When we re-ran the study in 2016, offshoring intent was clearly dropping to a 12% intended increase (which is a realistic number for a saturating market), but this year it has nose-dived to a mere 5% increase, which is a clear result of the anti-offshoring sentiment that has hurt offshore-centric deals:

Click to Enlarge

I discussed this trend with one of the lead partners at ISG, the offshore outsourcing industry's largest deal advisor, and he shared that Trump's stance against offshoring was considerably slowing down the deal cycle for his firm, and he was even seeing some outsourcing deals going to the likes of Accenture and IBM because it created the façade that work was not being offshored (even though it was).  Yes, this is the kind of stuff that happens when a president likes to get fast and loose with his twitter account! 

However, while Trump's open attacks on American firms using offshoring stoked panic into many paranoid C-Suites, what really transpired was a rapid shift in how US firms are viewing their partnerships with global service providers. Today's reality is technology has become core to business competitiveness by creating new revenue channels made possible by interactive communications technologies with customers, by simplifying business operations to support the business with real-time data, and by supporting broader processes that respond to the needs of customers, as they occur.

Offshoring may be slowing, but the services business is in its best shape for four years

The healthy trend here, for the future of IT and business services, is the fact that the industry finds itself on the healthiest growth footing since 2013 - so clearly offshoring is no longer the primary driver behind IT services investments:

Click to Enlarge

President Trump merely speeded up the development of global services from a cost-reduction to a business-value proposition

Many enterprise leaders are clearly no longer thinking, "How can we shave some more cost off our annual IT budget by moving more work to India?".  Instead, they are thinking, "How can I get quality services delivered at competitive prices that take advantage of the cloud, automation, and global talent."  The subtle shift here is clearly one from an obsessive focus on low cost, to one of getting quality services as the industry matures, where there are many leverage points to find productivity gains, beyond merely relying on FTE rates.  The more pricing shifts towards outcomes, volumes and KPIs, the less visible offshoring becomes as a cost-lever. 

When you buy electricity, do you care where the supplier houses its generators?  When you use public cloud services, do you bother to question Google, Amazon or Spotify where they house their massive data farms?  It's the same when engaging with IT services firms to get work done: business operations leaders are barely thinking about where they are located anymore - and all President Trump has done is shifted the optics, compelled the leading India-heritage firms to make substantially more onshore staff investments - which they needed to do in any case - as the nature of IT work is driving the need for greater client intimacy and physical proximity between service delivery staff and client staff. 

Traditional outsourcing is being replaced by partnering, and "offshoring" is not even part of that conversation

Our recent study looking at digital transformation to the OneOffice reveals that the majority (57%) of the highest quartile of performers in the Global 2000 (based on revenue and profitability) view their primary service providers as supporting their digital transformation roadmaps, as co-innovation partners helping them achieve co-defined business outcomes.  Only a third viewed their service providers solely as a resource to provision skills and scale via a headcount model:

Click to Enlarge

This data speaks volumes - enterprises digital leaders need providers which can work with them to achieve outcomes that are increasingly challenging - most no longer requisition 500 developers per year to code in ABAP for strategic initiatives - that is a commodity practice today, usually delegated to lower level manager to lead.  Nearly all G2000 firms, today, have a Chief Digital Officer tasked with taking their companies through significant business model change, enabled by smart technology provided by partners which understand what is required.  Whether the talent for these strategic projects resides in Bangalore, Basingstoke, Bucharest or Baton Rouge is moot - this is about getting results where top talent is hard to source, and the location is just not very relevant anymore.

The Bottom-line: Trump did us a favor and ripped off the legacy Band-Aid for the services industry

Trump's stance on offshore outsourcing sparked two behaviors which have set up the future of services to be far more value-driven and business oriented: All the major Indian-heritage service providers have been aggressive adding 10,000+ staff right across North America and Europe.  Several are also embarking on ambitious acquisitions of niche onshore digital firms (both creative and tech-driven) to engage themselves higher up the foodchain within their clients and be considered for more lucrative digital engagements where there are deeply engaged with their clients redesigning business models that need sophisticated technical support.  So while the industry suffered from a couple of flat years trying to squeeze the last vestiges of life out of a dying body-shopping model, the new reality is a global delivery model that is now embedded in engagements where the focus is much more on business value and outcomes than prehistoric effort-based inputs.  We are also entering an era where the likes of Cognizant, Infosys, TCS and Wipro will cease to be called "Indian providers" and merely be referred to as global IT services firms.  Location is irrelevant... expertise most definitively is not.

Posted in: Digital TransformationIT Outsourcing / IT ServicesDigital OneOffice

20

1 Comments

Can Infosys be the one to challenge Accenture's digital services dominance?

April 23, 2018 | Phil Fersht

It took a while, but we've finally seen the cards being played from Infosys' new CEO Salil Parekh - and it's a concerted digital play to offer clients an alternative to Accenture.  Make no bones about it, the intentions are crystal clear to reverse the course Vishal Sikka set with a software-centric "product" approach, and follow the Accenture model of creative digital services supported by technology-agnostic execution.  The firm, once affectionately dubbed the "Indian Accenture", has gone full circle to reclaim its mantle and revitalize itself as one of the key services alternatives to enterprise clients seeking high-value digital capabilities enabled by industrial-scale technology execution. Infosys has never been one to go about its business quietly - the firm likes to make big bold statements and attack the industry with a swagger - and, after a full year of navel-gazing as Sikka's reign fizzled out, amid a very public media obsessed with scrutinizing every private jet excursion and every former SAP executive's departure package, Salil has made his play in typical Infosys style.

With the chest-beating battle cries coming out of the firm's Q1 results, Salil and his new founder friends believe they have the credibility, brand and global presence to slip in front of its rivals, notably Cognizant, TCS and Wipro, and to make up for lost ground and quickly assert their presence in this digital race for client supremacy.  The (surprisingly open) stated effort to sell off their product acquisitions Panaya and Skava (and likely more), the recent acquisition of creative agency WONGDOODY, famous for its Superbowl ads, and its 2017 addition of London-based product design agency, Brilliant Basics, gives Infosys a creative digital footing in both US and Europe.  

So can Infosys break out of the pack to challenge?  Let's take a look at the Digital Services market...

There's been enough noise and confusion regarding what constitutes digital and which providers are truly breaking ground here, but the stark reality is that Accenture has made a relentless concerted acquisition strategy to dominate this market from the onset, and the current race is on from the rest of the service provider community to challenge them:

Click to Enlarge

Digital services provide the natural evolution of traditional IT and business services firms, while products-plus-services is a struggle

For all Vishal's intelligence and vision, the reality became very clear towards the later stages of his tenure as Infosys CEO: traditional IT services firms will always struggle to become products-plus-services firms as they simply do not have the channel to market, the sales structure or the culture to sell these offering at a one-to-many scale. "SAP has 45,000 clients while we only have 1,200" was his realization.  Services juggernauts like Infosys are never going to scale effectively down to the lower middle market, hence need to deepen their footprints with large clients which are profitable to manage in their global delivery model.  And remember Accenture's aborted attempts to make a mid-market play?  

A one-to-few model may work in very specific areas such as procurement (Accenture and Procurian) or healthcare (Cognizant and TriZetto), but these investments are substantial and require a significant amount of time, focus, and investment to make viable.  This is why Salil made the aggressive decision to abort Panaya and Skava - these require a massive effort to deepen sales and delivery capability to make these investments truly worthwhile and pivot Infosys into a much more specialized direction. The realistic growth for a firm like Infosys is in winning big-ticket enterprise services accounts on long-term deals that require significant scale and transformation.  There is a reason TCS is leading the services industry in valuation - it has its tentacles firmly wrapped around large, multi-year client relationships and is not bogged down in discreet product acquisitions.  

Digital services represent the high-value end of the services business where firms like Infosys can embed themselves for many years if they get this right - the ability to design, manage and deliver the customer engaging front office, supported by a digital underbelly, support organization and predictive analytics (as we at HfS term the "Digital OneOffice").  It is that ability to enable clients to respond to the needs of their customers in real-time: Digital is the wow factor that is setting apart today's services firms.  The reality is most of these providers are competent at delivering IT services at scale to meet whatever KPIs were agreed at the onset of a contract.  So the differentiation is that ability to help enterprise clients delivery the digital experience for their own clients - and you can only really do this if you have absorbed sufficient design and consulting talent at scale. Digital is much more about a services experience than a specific product experience - there are many apps and tools clients can use, but it's how they are aligned with the business strategy that really matters.  This is why Accenture's technology agnostic strategy of the last two decades is the one so many services firms are now following.

The Bottom-line: Accenture created the digital services market and there is no clear contender to take them on from an end-to-end services standpoint.  Infy has as good a shot as any of its key rivals

Three small-scale acquisitions are merely a statement of intent, but the hard work starts now - and it is a serious about of hard work!  While WONGDOODY and Brilliant Basics are very credible firms and get Infy on the map for digital design and media services, Salil and his cohorts need to savage the market with some further significant investments if it wants a place firmly at the big boys' table. Cognizant has done an excellent job taking its SMAC stack into a very meaningful effective digital offering, and currently is pushing Accenture the most aggressively, with focused offerings and marketing.  Wipro has made some admirable efforts with Designit and Appirio to win some notable deals and has been very focused on this space, vastly improving its communication and positioning with clients.  The reality is, no one has come anywhere close to rivaling Accenture's scale with digital and we need to see a lot more than some small agency investments if any of these firms want to make a realistic play at Accenture's dominance.  Firms like Infosys now have to bet big if they want to do more than pay lip service to the new wave of technology-focused offerings.  A major consulting acquisition, such as a Booz or AT Kearney, could make the difference, but will likely be a one-shot deal to make or break their strategy, and we all know how messy these services-plus-consultant acquisitions can get.  

The bolder play is to go after one of the large creative media/advertising agencies that offers clients and scale that get Infosys immediately to the table.  Firms like AKQA, BBH, M&C Saatchi, Ogilvy & Mather, Sid Lee and the Miller Group (to name a few) would deliver immediate credibility and digital design capability to a firm as ambitious as Infosys.  Infosys has the swagger to pull something like this off, but has never faced such a test of focus as it does right now - it has picked its path, now the firm needs to pace some serious, eye-catching investments to stay true to its word.  Most importantly, the Founders needs to stay true to Saili and not have him experience the wheels come off like they did for Vishal - that is not a road Infosys can afford to go down again, as next time there won't be a forgiveness factor from its clients or the industry at large.

Posted in: Digital TransformationDigital OneOffice

12

1 Comments

We're becoming obsessive social networkers with a huge appetite to learn from each other

April 15, 2018 | Phil Fersht

Remember that 70's movie "Logan's Run" when, in the 23rd century, the population and the consumption of resources are maintained in equilibrium by killing everyone who reaches the age of 30?  They found a simple fix to solve their problems. Today, we seem to be entering a similar situation with employment and intelligent automation: why not just retire everyone at 40 to protect those valuable employment resources? It sounds far easier than building a ridiculously long wall or pretending all these magical new jobs will appear from nowhere in a couple of years... 

Everyone, seemingly, is obsessing with the current swirl of anxiety infecting our whole career outlook, with relentless discussions raising our stress levels as we figure out how to "adapt" ourselves to a world where bots are going to do so much of our work at some indefinable moment in the future.  

It's just not cool to be normal anymore...

Whether we're mindlessly getting our hourly endorphin rush from those lovely social media sites that keep pulling us in, or dozing through yet another mind-numbing panel on the "impact of intelligent automation" at some horrendous conference we just had to go to (listening to people who previously had nothing to do with "automation" and have since become overnight luminaries), or simply chatting with colleagues in the office... there is now a constant angst that

Read More »

Posted in: Digital OneOfficeTalent in Sourcing

6

1 Comments

Gartner fails spectacularly with its 180 degree flip on the impact of AI Automation on jobs

April 07, 2018 | Phil Fersht

Whiplash alert: You may have noticed how Gartner recently flipped its core messaging from automation/AI being a seismic job destroyer to being now a job-creator.  And both times, they just can't seem to back up the rhetoric with actual facts.  Plus, they don't even seem to be able to define consistently what they actually mean by "AI Automation". 

Remember when Gartner claimed that automation and AI were not only going to replace a third of jobs by 2025, but many of us would be reporting to a robo-boss at some stage this year?  Well, guess what folks, they've now performed a complete 180-degree flip, claiming that millions of new jobs will be created after 2020, far outweighing their previously predicted gargantuan job losses (courtesy of LinkedIn).  Wow:

Let's dare to look back in time to hold Gartner to account

Peter Sondergaard, Gartner's Head of Research, predicted one in three jobs will be converted to software, robots and smart machines by 2025.  Yes he actually said that at his own Symposium, and even added, "New digital businesses require less labor; machines will make sense of data faster than humans can."  However, unlike the good old days when analysts could get away with all flavors of outlandish grandstanding soundbites to spice up a conference, these predictions tend to hang around the internet these days.  While many people love to keep spinning new headlines everyday, in the hope #fakenews is now the #realnews, some of us still have memory banks that last longer than one week, especially when CIOs spend billions of dollars for this type of council.  

And then who can forget this almighty whopper from Fran Karamouzis, a vice president and distinguished analyst at Gartner:

By 2018, more than three million workers globally will be supervised by "robo-bosses".  Excellent, so Fran's surely keeping her fingers crossed that the robo-boss takeover is even more imminent than Donald Trump's interview with Robert Mueller...

Gartner's new claim why AI and Automation will create this massive net gain in jobs

When Gartner put out this far more positive news, I was so excited, and couldn't wait to hear their new rationale:

Click to read full press release

"Many significant innovations in the past have been associated with a transition period of temporary job loss, followed by recovery, then business transformation and AI will likely follow this route," said Svetlana Sicular, research vice president at Gartner. AI will improve the productivity of many jobs, eliminating millions of middle- and low-level positions, but also creating millions more new positions of highly skilled, management and even the entry-level

Read More »

Posted in: Cognitive ComputingRobotic Process AutomationIntelligent Automation

31

1 Comments

Fed up with the AI nonsense? Well here's your reality check...

April 05, 2018 | Phil Fersht

Fed up with even the hype being so overhyped, that even The MIT Media Lab is severing ties with a brain-embalming company that promoted euthanasia to people hoping for digital immortality through “brain uploads"?  Yes really. 

Then waste no time as we plan to steer you back to some version of reality next week with an unvarnished, unsponsored, unpuffed view of the world, where any spin if countered with a powerful forehand down the line:

Click here to reserve your virtual seat now!

Posted in: Cognitive ComputingRobotic Process AutomationIntelligent Automation

0

0 Comments

It's not all about mindset: The lack of IT talent is the biggest roadblock to reaching the Digital OneOffice promised land

April 02, 2018 | Phil Fersht

If I had a dollar every time an executive bemoaned their firm’s inability to “change their mindset”, to do anything differently to escape their habitual ways of running operations.  And if I had a further greenback for every advisor who bemoaned how idiotic their customers are, because they “just don’t have the deep expertise to fix their underlying data structure", I would have long retired to the Trappist Order to brew very strong beer for connoisseurs with beards (that doesn’t actually taste very nice, but it's just so beardy).

Surely the perfect desired outcome, even if it tastes like crap

It's all about bringing the operations closer to the customer, and lacking IT talent is a major impediment to achieving it

Getting to the point here, it’s one thing demanding your employees change how they approach their jobs to benefit your firm from deploying advanced automation and cognitive tools, but entirely another if you don’t have the technical expertise to put them to work.  It’s one thing to design a leading-edge digital interface with your customers, but it’s rendered pretty useless if you don’t have the capability to integrate it with your operations to provide customer support, get your products and services to them and harvest their data to keep making smart marketing decisions to stay ahead of demand. It’s one effort to redesign processes around your customers, entirely another to redesign your operational infrastructure to make it actually happen

We recently interviewed 100 C-Suite executives from major enterprises and split the discussion across both business and IT leaders.  While the industry obsesses about whether C-Suites know where to where to invest, what are their desired outcomes etc., we don't focus nearly enough on the impediments preventing them from achieving these goals.  We focus far too much on firms' short-term spending on tools, and not enough on defining the ultimate outcomes and drawing up real investment and change management plans to get there. As we recently discussed, if we only focus on the means, we will never arrive at the end. To address this, we presented the OneOffice Concept to understand what is holding back both business and IT leaders from reaching the promised land of perfect real-time symmetry of their business operations staying ahead of their customers’ needs:

Click to Enlarge

The Bottom-line: The Right Brain only functions when it's in sync with the Left Brain 

As we have widely discussed, four-out-of-ten customers (see earlier blog) going through initial deployments of RPA software are struggling to meet the business cases and cost savings goals.  And when we bring hundreds of enterprise leaders together at our HfS Summits, the story is consistent: business struggling with change, but they struggle even more with aligning the right technical expertise to work alongside their business talent.  Simply put, today's firms are struggling with having IT depth to take their ambitious C-Suites where they want to go.  So where do we go from here?

IT is at the heart of C-Suite strategy - it's a business discussion that only works with the right IT capability.  You only needed to eavesdrop on the many C-level discussions at Davos to know the IT discussion is firmly at the core of the business. Being able to satisfy your customer's digital business needs is where it's all heading.  I was recently talking their the Group Finance Head at HSBC and his whole focus is on two elements - having the best digital app delivery and providing the best customer experience, which is incredibly challenging for any business environment grappling with differing compliance needs across borders, and ever-demanding customers wanting to do all their banking on an iPad.  However, while this is a challenge, it is also a massive opportunity for the ambitious who get their business design and IT skillset equation right.  

Finding the right partners is more crucial than ever.  There is a massive opportunity to lead in the world of IT services, provided you can plug these skills gaps.  The challenge is breaking out of the traditional sourcing model to access niche talent across the globe in areas such as crypto-technology, Python development, Lisp, Prolog, Go and C++.  While most traditional firms still rely heavily on bread and butter IT services delivered at scale from regions such as India, the emergence of talent in Central and Eastern Europe, China and parts of South America also need to be brought into play.  The IT services world will be a very different place in a couple of years as boutique firms offering niche skills come into the fore.  Not to mention the emergence of crowdsourcing for IT talent.  Having really savvy IT leaders who can cobble together crack teams on-tap to solve their IT headaches is already becoming a huge differentiator for many firms.  The will also be a role for the super services integrator, who can pull together teams for clients to work with them on complex projects.

Simplification of business operations is the real key to future success. In short, there is no silver bullet to solve these endemic issues companies are facing to break out of legacy ways of working, but being able to align a determined mindset shift on the business side with smart IT skills to bring it to reality, is the only true way forward for firms who know their days are numbered, if they cannot change their inner workings to get somewhere near a OneOffice end-state.  The future is really all about simplifying operations to bring them completely in line with the world of the customer.  Hence, successful businesses need IT folks who can think logically to simplify business operations through the use of automation, cognitive, AI and digital.  It's not just about software packages and APIs, it's about both business and IT staff learning to understand each other's strengths and challenges better.  It's really not rocket science, it's about learning to simplify business models to stay ahead of your customers' needs and not giving your competitors a window to take you out of your market...because that may already be happening to you.

Posted in: Digital OneOffice

13

1 Comments

And there went another April Fools' Day...

April 01, 2018 | Phil Fersht

I hope you enjoyed our little blockchain fools' fun today, but here is possibly the greatest ever from BBC Sport...

Posted in: Absolutely Meaningless Comedy

0

0 Comments

How blockchain will change the world in many more ways than you realize. It’s cataclysmic

April 01, 2018 | Phil Fersht

We all know that Blockchain has emerged as the world's leading software platform for digital assets, however, new research is demonstrating its value could go even further than merely digital assets. Blockchain can reinvigorate parts of your infrastructure that have been under-performing for years to have a dramatic increase on the satisfaction of your partners, your customers and possibly even your employees…

HfS research’s new findings indicate that many enterprise back offices are in dire need of a complete transformation in order to come close to achieving the desired outcomes of their partners.  Yes, folks, the impact of blockchains is causing many flagging enterprise assets to stand to attention, desperate to reclaim their former splendor and glory.  According to one automation governance lead from a major consumer products firm, “Why rip and replace legacy assets when you still have plenty of mileage to glean from your trusted old systems?  Ever since we got on the Blockchain Program, we’re rediscovering the ability to perform in a manner I’ve not experienced for at least twenty years.”

As with every technology magic bullet, the conversation always reverts to “hammers finding nails”, as many executives long to revive the glory days of shaving more off their bottom line in order to achieve more attractive results.

To this end, a financial controller of a FORTUNE 20 bank declared, “I had practically given up on ever meeting the demands of my various partners.  Every time we were asked to perform, we just couldn’t connect the pieces.  We tried every solution on the market, every tool off the shelf, even some special robots… we were a hammer trying to find a nail, but the nail just wouldn’t find the hole.  Until we were introduced to blockchain, and suddenly everything changed…”.

There’s something about the nature of a distributed ledger that enables even the most seasoned of industry executives to re-live the days of their youth, a revelation that has put the wind up Pfizer, whose market is the latest to be on the verge of disruption.  According to one disgruntled Prizer executive, “We are very concerned about the impact of Blockchain on our business lines.  We have been warning customers of the serious side effects a Blockchain is going to have, with its sheer processing grunt depleting energy resources to an alarming extent.  We advise affected customers to call their on-demand service provider for urgent support, especially after more than four hours of vigorous non-stop blockchain activity that is showing no signs of slowing down.”

HfS analysts also caught up with a leading executive from IBM, John Holmes, who added, “Thanks to blockchain, there is a huge opportunity to get our firm back on course for some serious straight line growth.” 

And when we managed to get Accenture blockchain guru, Peter North, on the phone who revealed, "Blockchain promises high performance delivered and we aim to deliver that high performance. Delivered."

Even President Donald Trump has confirmed the future potential of Blockchain in a recent series of tweets where he argued ‘It’s the best. The greatest. Just great. I’m so glad I came up with idea before Cambridge Analytica and Facebook. But seriously, Ivanka, is there any way we can delete some of the data on there? Yes those blocks called Stormy, delete them.’

And of course... this was an:

Read More »

Posted in: Blockchain

6

1 Comments